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Topic Title: Older pvc/pvc cable - sheath colours
Topic Summary: (for help in ageing installations during EICR's)
Created On: 19 June 2013 12:51 PM
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 19 June 2013 12:51 PM
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steviestrikes

Posts: 137
Joined: 22 May 2005

A couple of quickies...

1) Can someone confirm in which year white-sheathed flat cable was introduced (I know it went grey again in 2005) - and also confirm that it hadn't been issued before that?

2) in what period was 3-core flat cable with insulation coloured red, white and blue used? (I don't think I've ever seen this with a cpc, has anyone else)?

Thanks in advance.

(Any other pointers for assessing the ages of installations welcome).
 19 June 2013 01:07 PM
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impvan

Posts: 809
Joined: 07 September 2005

White sheathed came out with generic grey pvc, i.e. when it stopped being called 'ashathene' an the likes. I know of some from the early 80's for certain. It has never 'gone grey again'. It's still availaible and still used - I think it's just a regional thing.

RWB three core was early-60's onwards and ran concurrently with VIR as rubber died out.
 19 June 2013 01:11 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11679
Joined: 13 August 2003

1) Can someone confirm in which year white-sheathed flat cable was introduced (I know it went grey again in 2005) - and also confirm that it hadn't been issued before that?

White sheathed PVC has been around for donkey's years - AFAIK there was no standard for the sheath colour - both grey and white were available at least from the 1970s. With harmonised core colours the sheath colour was also standardised - grey for PVC, white for XLPE.

I'm too young to know about 2.

- Andy.

(edited to correct Ls and Ps)
 19 June 2013 03:37 PM
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Pacific

Posts: 596
Joined: 29 January 2005

I thought white sheath was LSOH now
 19 June 2013 03:54 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11679
Joined: 13 August 2003

I thought white sheath was LSOH now

I think that's right - as I understand it, low smoke zero halogen, LSF, etc characteristics are normally achieved by using cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) in place of poly vinyl chloride (PVC).
- Andy.
 19 June 2013 04:27 PM
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Ricicle

Posts: 848
Joined: 23 October 2006

A lot of DIY centres/stores used to only supply white pvc cable (especially Wickes) I did a job in London in 1990 where the whole house was in white t+e so either it was prefered there or was a DIY job.
Our old factory was built in '61 and had RWB swa

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 19 June 2013 05:13 PM
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Pacific

Posts: 596
Joined: 29 January 2005

Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

I thought white sheath was LSOH now


I think that's right - as I understand it, low smoke zero halogen, LSF, etc characteristics are normally achieved by using cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) in place of poly vinyl chloride (PVC).

- Andy.


That's a new one on me, had a look on wiki and the two seem to have different meanings, but you live and learn
 19 June 2013 08:36 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 1797
Joined: 14 December 2006

1) My guess is mid 1970's, white was certainly available in the early 1980's.

2) Common in houses built or rewired during the 1960's.
 19 June 2013 08:45 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11679
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That's a new one on me, had a look on wiki and the two seem to have different meanings, but you live and learn

Sorry - my attempt to clarify just causes more confusion (again) - I'll try again...

You're quite right - the white sheath correctly means LS0H (or similar low smoke zero halogen type acronym) rather than dictating the actual type of plastics used. My reference to PVC and XLPE isn't necessarily true - just based on my observation that all the LS0H cables I've looked at have XLPE insulation rather than PVC - but other compounds could be used. Although as PVC (poly vinyl chloride) necessarily contains chlorine - a halogen - it would be hard to see how PVC based cables could be classed as halogen free.

- Andy.
 19 June 2013 10:03 PM
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leckie

Posts: 1943
Joined: 21 November 2008

I have not thoroughly read all this thread but. .........
You used to get grey or white T&E depending what part of he country you lived in. All the same price. Then.......
Grey stayed as standard T&E and white became low smoke.

So there might be a mixture out there, make no assumptions. Where I live it's all grey.
 20 June 2013 12:34 AM
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westfield6

Posts: 124
Joined: 12 October 2007

I've come across (once) imperial 7/029 T & E with a PVC white sheath so that makes it in the 60s.
 20 June 2013 12:43 AM
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Martynduerden

Posts: 3211
Joined: 13 July 2008

I'm not sure White twin will be of much use as a real age indicator.

The age identifiers can be easier to spot.

Asherthene ? usually printed on the cable.
Green sleeve?

I seem to see quite alot of Red White and Blue and I have always thought it was out by early 60s?

Also look at the BS standard printed on the equipment - they get revised so often it can be quite good for dating purposes.

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