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Topic Title: Flats
Topic Summary: Grade of fire alarms
Created On: 22 April 2013 07:24 PM
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 22 April 2013 07:24 PM
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Ampman

Posts: 1012
Joined: 06 February 2006

Evening ,

Customer is converting a large single flat into 3 seperate flats .

Im thinking that a fire alarm needs installing so that if a alarm is set off in one flat they go off in the other flats .

Is this set up a HMO .

Or can the flats be kept separate meaning alarms are kept separate .

Thankyou
 22 April 2013 07:35 PM
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rocknroll

Posts: 8846
Joined: 03 October 2005

Read this; for HMO's, flats.

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/14884/fsra-sleeping-accommodation.pdf

regards

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leave nothing but footprints!"
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"Oh! The drama of it all."
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"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
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Edited: 22 April 2013 at 08:20 PM by rocknroll
 22 April 2013 08:08 PM
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OMS

Posts: 19668
Joined: 23 March 2004

If you are having a duvet day, you are going to be mightily p****d off that next door have been up with the lark and burnt the toast.

Residential properties rarely have linked alarms - they rely on a defend in place strategy - so make sure the builders knows what a fire compartment wall looks like.

They can't be HMO's - no one is living as a family group - you all have your own front door and there are no common facilites such as catering or laundry.

Ask your client for his means of complying with Approved Document B - and then go from there.

Regards

OMS

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Failure is always an option
 22 April 2013 09:21 PM
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Ampman

Posts: 1012
Joined: 06 February 2006

Ok ,

So can i recommend the installation of smoke alarms & a heat detector in each individual flat wired back to there fusebox .

& dont worry about interlinking the flats ?
 22 April 2013 09:56 PM
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ebee

Posts: 5698
Joined: 02 December 2004

You could use radio linked ones.
That way they could be used on an as per individual flat basis or decide if both parties would prefer to be interlinked ("I`d like to know if next door is afire!" type/Good neighbour type situation).



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Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 22 April 2013 11:53 PM
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DOUGIE1000

Posts: 4165
Joined: 13 August 2005

A HMO is a house of multiple occupation, this would only be is it was shared toilet and kitchen within a flat or house, ie bedsit with shared facilities

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Dougie
Power Plus Electrical.co.uk

My mission is to live as long as possible......so far so good!
 23 April 2013 08:03 AM
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OldSparky

Posts: 592
Joined: 28 June 2011

domestic smokes in the lounge near bedroom,

and heat detectors in the hall way on a panel system maybe?
 23 April 2013 08:04 AM
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leckie

Posts: 1863
Joined: 21 November 2008

As OMS says, the builder has to have a fire strategy and comply with Part B. Depending on the building type, this can be done in many ways.

For example, I did a block of flats 3 storey, timber frame. All the flats had BS5839 part 6 systems, not interlinked. The communal staircase area had no alarm, but had a smoke vent system; a Velux window operated by a smoke detector on the top floor and a break glass by the exit door. The rest of the fire strategy was by fire compartments between each flat and the communal area. Double plasterboard basically.

This was what the architect agreed with building control.
 23 April 2013 09:42 AM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7235
Joined: 18 April 2006

From RnR's link:

"HMOs include bedsits, hostels, accommodation above shops,
shared houses and flats, houses partly converted into selfcontained
flats and buildings fully converted into self contained
flats where the conversion work does not comply with the 1991
Building Regulations and where less than 2/3 of the flats are
occupied by long leaseholders."


Regards

BOD
 23 April 2013 01:43 PM
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whjohnson

Posts: 723
Joined: 24 January 2009

Last time I was involved in something like this, we got the local chief fire officer out - it costs nothing and his recommendations were most useful.

He recommended the fire compartmentalization route for 2 flats above a shop, along with one heat alarm in each kitchen, and one ionisation alarm in each internal hallway.

Job easily done.

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