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Topic Title: Repairs
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Created On: 10 April 2013 02:28 PM
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 10 April 2013 02:28 PM
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insafehands

Posts: 57
Joined: 21 January 2009

Hi,
In course of inspection and testing of appliances a extension reel failed because of a split cable near the reel.

I am having a look at cutting out the damaged section and re-connecting the cable at the reel end.

I have carefully dismantled the reel and found that the wires are soldered internally. I thought about using appropriate cable connectors (the type that can be crimped to connect the incoming cable with the internal cable. The connections would be made within the reel and would be protected. Then re-test the appliance.

I'm not sure about such a repair as I do not want to change the way the reel is constructed.

What does everyone think?

Regards

Kevin
 10 April 2013 02:45 PM
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OMS

Posts: 19433
Joined: 23 March 2004

Do you own, or have access to, and have the skills to use, a soldering iron - that seems to be by far the best solution.

Regards

OMS

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Failure is always an option
 10 April 2013 02:56 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11259
Joined: 13 August 2003

Exactly my first thought OMS - but then I wondered if that should make me feel old

I've some hesitation about connectors loose within portable equipment - in my mind's eye I can see them being shaken around and so putting extra stress on the conductors/connections. I guess they could be glued down, but that feels a but like needing two wrongs to make a right.

BTW extensions leads aren't classed as appliances these days are they? - not being current consuming equipment and all that. (or am I even more out of touch than I thought).

- Andy.
 10 April 2013 04:43 PM
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Jaymack

Posts: 4585
Joined: 07 April 2004

Originally posted by: insafehands
I am having a look at cutting out the damaged section and re-connecting the cable at the reel end.

Is it economical when considering the replacement cost?

I have carefully dismantled the reel and found that the wires are soldered internally. I thought about using appropriate cable connectors (the type that can be crimped to connect the incoming cable with the internal cable. The connections would be made within the reel and would be protected. Then re-test the appliance.

If the cost justified the repair or it was my own, then I would certainly crimp, provided that the cable was securely anchored inside the reel. Advise a reel replacement, and you may also have won a yourself a reel to repair! As an alternative to crimping, I would tie a knot in the cores before soldering and taping, if the cable was secured inside the reel.

Regards
 10 April 2013 06:15 PM
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Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19433
Joined: 23 March 2004

Exactly my first thought OMS - but then I wondered if that should make me feel old


That's two of us then, Andy -

Regards

OMS

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Failure is always an option
 10 April 2013 08:57 PM
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Grumpy

Posts: 405
Joined: 09 January 2009

My son has got his first job in London and we were in Tescos buying bedding and the like and he needed a four way extension with 2m of cable. Tesco only had them with 1m. No problem, I'm an electrician, I'll soon put a new bit of cable on that. Swapped the plug. Turned my attention to the four way and found it was fastened with security screws. My set of security screwdrivers was in the van which was rammed after working away for the week. A good hour later van unloaded opened up four way to find the flex was sort of spot welded onto the conductors. No problem I'll solder the new cables. Dug out grandfather's electric soldering iron and remembered that it had vibrated to bits in the van. Spent an hour reassembling it. Plugged it in and off I went. Managed to solder the live and the house RCD tripped. Eventually, several RCD trips later manged to solder the neutral. Alas, couldn't get it hot enough for long enough to solder the earth. Rummaged in garage and unearthed grandfather's irons that you heat on the gas. Job done. In all took over three hours. Went into Countrywide for dog food the next day and they had four way extensions with 2m of cable for a fiver! I think I'm with Jaymack.
 10 April 2013 09:08 PM
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aligarjon

Posts: 2799
Joined: 09 September 2005

Originally posted by: Grumpy

My son has got his first job in London and we were in Tescos buying bedding and the like and he needed a four way extension with 2m of cable. Tesco only had them with 1m. No problem, I'm an electrician, I'll soon put a new bit of cable on that. Swapped the plug. Turned my attention to the four way and found it was fastened with security screws. My set of security screwdrivers was in the van which was rammed after working away for the week. A good hour later van unloaded opened up four way to find the flex was sort of spot welded onto the conductors. No problem I'll solder the new cables. Dug out grandfather's electric soldering iron and remembered that it had vibrated to bits in the van. Spent an hour reassembling it. Plugged it in and off I went. Managed to solder the live and the house RCD tripped. Eventually, several RCD trips later manged to solder the neutral. Alas, couldn't get it hot enough for long enough to solder the earth. Rummaged in garage and unearthed grandfather's irons that you heat on the gas. Job done. In all took over three hours. Went into Countrywide for dog food the next day and they had four way extensions with 2m of cable for a fiver! I think I'm with Jaymack.




Its nice to have a chuckle at the end of the day. cheers.

Gary

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Specialised Subject. The Bleedin Obvious. John Cleese
 11 April 2013 01:06 AM
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M.Joshi

Posts: 212
Joined: 10 January 2003

I have repaired a few mains extension lead reels on metal stands. Often there has been damage to the outer cable sheath or sometimes to the inner conductor sheaths too. On the older ones, it was just a case of cutting the cable where it was damaged, removing the damaged section of cable attached via screw terminals to the sockets inside the reel and re-terminating the good section of cable into the screw terminals.

With some of the newer reels where the cable is welded to the terminals, it's worth bearing in mind that a solder connection may not hold the wires securely if subjected to rough handling.

Whenever I repaired an extension reel, I always placed a sticker on it stating that it had been repaired by me and the date. It might also be worth noting the new length of cable on the reel so that anyone in the future conducting a PAT on it can factor in the correct cable length.

Although as others have said, it is probably more cost effective/less hassle to buy a new one which may have an RCD inline too!

The ones I was repairing weren't very old and were around 30m in length which weren't as cheap to replace as the shorter extension leads:



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 12 April 2013 09:41 AM
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deleted_1_Grizzly01

Posts: 250
Joined: 21 February 2008

Originally posted by: AJJewsbury
BTW extensions leads aren't classed as appliances these days are they? - not being current consuming equipment and all that. (or am I even more out of touch than I thought).


I fear you may be.
Extension leads, power cords, etc. have always been classed as appliances, certainly for inspection and testing purposes.
Current consumption has no bearing on the matter.
 15 April 2013 01:16 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11259
Joined: 13 August 2003

Current consumption has no bearing on the matter.

Not in BS 7671 terms (see definition in part 2) .... seems odd if other sections of the industry take a contradictory view.
- Andy.
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