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Topic Title: Customer satisfaction
Topic Summary: LED's
Created On: 18 March 2013 08:09 AM
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 18 March 2013 08:09 AM
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SherlockOhms

Posts: 313
Joined: 05 April 2011

Chaps,

What do you guys do in order to ensure customer satisfaction.
Almost every LED install I do provokes some kind of debate.

So, is the answer to carry a test set of all LED's white variations and fit each one untill the customer is happy?

Frustrated.

S.
 18 March 2013 08:34 AM
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Grandfortune

Posts: 343
Joined: 10 April 2007

Usually i have to come back and finish or do extra woks so i put half with warm white in and half with cool white, those are the only two types i offer, and then they decide what they want.

Cheers
Grand
 18 March 2013 09:55 AM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 10963
Joined: 13 August 2003

i put half with warm white in and half with cool white, those are the only two types i offer, and then they decide what they want.

There's some good psychology there! It seems that success is achieved by giving the customer a choice, although not necessarily a meaningful one. I knew someone who used to run the local cub scouts - at the annual camp there was always a problem getting the lads to go to bed at a reasonable hour. His solution was avoid saying "Do you want to go to bed now?" or "It's time for bed!" as both approaches produced arguments. His solution was to say "It's bed time now, which do you want to do first? - get changed into your pyjamas or clean your teeth?" The arguments were then centred around the pyjamas/teeth debate and the point about actually having to go to bed was accepted without comment! (Occasionally I wonder if the same tactic is used on a larger scale.)

- Andy.
 18 March 2013 10:46 AM
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Cremeegg

Posts: 495
Joined: 13 July 2007

I always demonstrate the different colours and leave them with the customer to play with for a while. Did a bathroom recently - they had opted for cool white - a few days after fitting they complained about it looking like an operating theatre. So I changed to warm white - they are happy now and accept that it was their fault and paid for both sets of lamps. Result.

LED's seem to provoke more debate than any other type of lamp even though many others are available in differing colours. People tend not to notice the different colours in fluorescents but do with LED's.
 18 March 2013 11:03 AM
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mikejumper

Posts: 1670
Joined: 14 December 2006

Originally posted by: Cremeegg
LED's seem to provoke more debate than any other type of lamp even though many others are available in differing colours. People tend not to notice the different colours in fluorescents but do with LED's.

It doesn't help that there seems to be a big difference between manufacturers in how they describe the colour.
 18 March 2013 03:21 PM
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BrucieBonus

Posts: 621
Joined: 20 February 2007

I always take a neutral white and a warm white fitting to show the customer (they are also impressed with the light output). So far everyone has gone with neutral white, but I think Andy's right - offer them the choice then if they don't like them, it's their shout!
 18 March 2013 07:01 PM
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Cremeegg

Posts: 495
Joined: 13 July 2007

It doesn't help that there seems to be a big difference between manufacturers in how they describe the colour.


I always use their colour temperatures so 2700K is 2700K; mind you I've found huge variations is what different suppliers call say 2700K.

I find in a domestic situation people tend to go for warm white as its closer to a traditional tungsten - unless they have a modern white/black decor then they tend to go for the natural white. Commercially people tend to go for what they had before - generally a more natural white.
 22 March 2013 04:37 PM
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guitarplayer63

Posts: 1
Joined: 22 March 2013

To build on the previous posters comments, the first thing is to pick 2700K and then to test it to see what it really is like.

I've noticed some manufacturers are now saying "Very Warm White" which is a more yellowy - tungsten colour than white LED. I've been doing some research on this and concluded:
The LED lights with lots of little LEDs are not eye friendly at all, they don't cast shadows (because the light comes from everywhere) and are normally very white (hard white).
Ikea make a pretty cheap GU10 2700K LED light, colour is really good and warm, but the lamp will get stuck in a normal GU10 downlighter fitting - be prepared to remove the whole fitting to get it out again.
The best results I've had have been with Philips 4W and 6W master dimmable LED's - the downside is they are really expensive, but the colour is the best of all that I've seen.
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