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Topic Title: Self-build
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Created On: 28 February 2013 07:33 PM
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 28 February 2013 07:33 PM
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gnelmes

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Joined: 28 February 2013

In the past I have carried out extensive electrical work before you had to be "qualified" . All of it was tested. I am now about to undertake a self-build and want to do the electrical work myself. I am willing to undertake the proper training but how do I become competent to self-certificate? I would not be undertaking electrical work as a career?

Would this be "cost -effective" way of doing things?
 28 February 2013 07:55 PM
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vesuvius

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Joined: 19 November 2012

You would certainly need to be deemed a COMPETANT person to carry out the testing and sign of installations.

How do you get to this. The answer seems to vary from place to place around the U.K. certainly where I reside it would be a level 3 qualification in installing and commissioning electrotechnical systems, or a very similar qualification. 17th edition wiring regulations and 2395 certified.
 28 February 2013 08:15 PM
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AJJewsbury

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I don't think you necessary need to be 'qualified' to wire a house even these days, but there are two bits of certification to think about (presuming you're building in England or Wales) - wiring regs (BS 7671) and building regs. As you're self-building you'll be aware of building regs - part P covers electrical work, and certain bits (along with foundations, drains, etc) are notifiable to the LA (or private equivalent). You can't self-certify for part P unless you're a member of a recognised competent persons' scheme - and membership of such a scheme will cost you many hundreds of pounds for a single year (£500+). You might notice that your local builder probably won't be a member of a scheme for foundations and drains and things, but pay the LABC to inspect & certify for them. You can use exactly the same procedure for electrics - if you're lucky notfication for part P will have been done as part of your main building regs application, if you're unlucky you might need to notify it separately - for around £200 (LAs are now allowed to charge extra for electrics over and above normal notification, and usually do). So for a one-off, LA notification is probably the cheapest and easiest option.

I'm doing my own renovation (& complete rewire) at the moment - and so far at least the LABC have been rather helpful and seem willing to accept my BS 7671 certs even though I don't have any paper qualifications to wave about provided everything looks OK when I've finished.

- Andy.
 01 March 2013 03:28 PM
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bajb

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Joined: 20 November 2002

If you want to become qualified to self certify your own electrical work under the building regulations then the cheapest and easiest way if you have some sort of engineering background is probably the Napit Just 8 route. You will find it through google.
 01 March 2013 10:18 PM
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antric2

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Evening Gnelms,
I dont think it cost effective for you to do the courses if you arenot going to do electrical work on a regular basis.
We have worked with many self builders and we become consultants\advisors really on an hourly basis.
Any electrician can advise you and inspect and test each circuit and stage of the job.Also, your building control may charge you quite abit if they do this and not accept your certificate if you are not part of a self cert scheme thus making you pay extortionate rates for one of their preferred testers.
Books to use as ref guides are Electricians guide to the building regs,onsite guide,current regs 7671 and the Part P doctor book is superb.
This forumn has some very experienced and knowledgable people also.
Only you can decide what is best for you but good luck on your mission.
regards
Antric
 02 March 2013 01:49 PM
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gnelmes

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Many thanks to everyone for your very helpful suggestions. It has given me hope and a lot of food for thought.

It would useful if I could do me own testing before getting it "certified". Wahat would be the best equipment to buy/rent?
 02 March 2013 05:04 PM
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mikejumper

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Originally posted by: gnelmes
Many thanks to everyone for your very helpful suggestions. It has given me hope and a lot of food for thought.
It would useful if I could do me own testing before getting it "certified". Wahat would be the best equipment to buy/rent?

A multifunction tester may be the best option for you as it will perform all the required tests.
These cost several hundred pounds to buy so in your situation you're better off hiring one.
 02 March 2013 08:28 PM
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Cremeegg

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I wouldn't waste money on a tester and time to learn how to test. Do you know how to test, which test and in which order, and what the results mean? A decent local sparks would pop in every so often and test as you go. I would and have helped a couple of self builders in the past. Great getting someone else to do all the dirty work.
 02 March 2013 09:25 PM
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Zs

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gnelmes,

welcome to the forum.

May I point out that Andy Jewsbury is a genius who knows considerably more than his local building control. I've a notion that they may be falling at his feet because he is better than they are.

I would suggest that you talk to building control before you start anything and find out what they would accept.

Where I am they let DIY work take place so long as it is inspected and tested at the end by one of their chosen few. Those who are prepared to pay for the occasional visit during their work benefit from advice and usually obtain a satisfactory report. Those who just go ahead merrily most often have a bit to remedy before they can have the golden ticket. Only fair IMHO, we study hard to be up to date and make a living out of knowing what we know. See what your local BC have to say. Don't panic in silence and try to slip anything past anyone because it might be dangerous.

If this is a complete build then you must remember part L, which relates to energy efficiency. It is free to download on the web. They will be hot on that.

Good luck. I hope you have strong shoulders, on several levels. Ask us if you get stuck.

Zs

Edit: Andy, need someone to come and inspect it for you?

Edited: 02 March 2013 at 09:33 PM by Zs
 02 March 2013 10:03 PM
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Zs

Posts: 3038
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As an extra gnelmes, have a look at this thread:

">http://www.theiet.org/...s/f.....terthread=y


It was locked by the moderators (boo) because we beat the poster up, in spades.

But note the compeletely different tone used by the man who posted it, and our response to him compared to you and yours.

In terms of human nauture and only using the written word, look at how well disposed this forum is to you already. Yet your question is much the same.

I quite like it that both threads have happened in a short time span.

Oh fluke, the link doesn't work because the moderators locked the thread. You'll have to go down the list and look for one called 'Two questions, go easy please' posted by mannpaul. Enjoy.

Zs
 03 March 2013 01:11 AM
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ectophile

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The link had extra characters on the end - it should be http://www.theiet.org/forums/f...id=51146&enterthread=y

-------------------------
S P Barker BSc PhD MIET
 17 March 2013 09:02 PM
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LowZe

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Joined: 17 March 2013

qnelmes

I agree with Zs & Cremeegg.

As you consider yourself 'installation competent' - as many better DIYers are - the most cost effective way through the Building Regs / BS7671 reqts is to find a scheme electrician willing to verify design of the amendments to your circuits (e.g. cable sizes, discrimination, additional protection reqts, special locations) for BS7671 wiring regs compliance before you start the job, allow you to undertake the dirty work, and then return to inspect, test and issue Minor Electrical Inst Works Cert or Electrical Installation Cert (depending on nature/complexity of changes).

With appropriate drawings, dims and existing installation info, the 'before' bit can likely be done remotely via the ether and, subject to the quality of your installation work and adherence to design being up to scratch, the inspect, test and issue of certification (from your description of the works) should take a visit of no more than an hour. This will satisfy both your LABC officer in the short term, and any prospective purchaser of the property in the future.

Check out the likes of Link removed

LowZe
 18 March 2013 05:44 AM
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MrP

Posts: 854
Joined: 24 March 2006

Welcome to the forum

Would this be "cost -effective" way of doing things?

As others have said you don't have to be competent, it's how competent your local building control are and from my experience that can vary greatly.
As regards wiring get the 17th edition on site guide it has clear diagrams of how to install standard circuits. cable sizes and installation methods.
It's my recommendation regarding the wiring that you don't personally get building control involved at all, its all being done by a" badge"
What you do is before you start any work approach your local sparkie with a badge (because they have a badge doesn't necessarily mean that they are any more or less competent than yourself it means that they have bought the badge and possibly own some test gear)

A good place to find the badged sparkie would be the place your going to buy your wiring accessories. I personally would use Neweys or Eddies but there are others
To purchase your mats go with a list and play one off against the other to get the best price


Armed with the on site guide and the architect plans You tell the sparkie exactly what you are going to do and what you want him to do, test it, cert it and notify building control, you tell him what you are going to pay him I would think somewhere between £150 /£200

If he says no you get the yellow pages out, there are more badges than you can shake a stick at, the world and his dog has got a badge I am sure I don't have to tell your mother how to suck eggs

This is a sad indictment of the Part P system you get you house wired it gets tested and cert, complies with the current legislation and there has been minimal contact with the nuggets from the council and its cost you £200 to get through the hoop job done

Probably not most want to hear but the truth


Good luck buddy hope it goes well
MrP
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