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Topic Title: Safe Plates
Topic Summary: Thin
Created On: 22 January 2013 07:13 AM
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 22 January 2013 07:13 AM
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Avatar for ebee.
ebee

Posts: 5698
Joined: 02 December 2004

I saw some "safe plates" yesterday for protecting pipes and cables from Screwfix.
I was surprised how thin they were (0.9mm) I thought they`d be at least 3mm thick.
Are all makes the same?

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Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 22 January 2013 09:40 AM
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daveparry1

Posts: 6201
Joined: 04 July 2007

I remember using some a few years ago and they were about 3mm thick. The ones you mention would give about as much protection as metal capping on a wall, (which is *all, that's why I don't use it) I suppose you could put 3 together, depending on where you're using them, is it across a joist notch?

Dave.
 22 January 2013 01:19 PM
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impvan

Posts: 766
Joined: 07 September 2005

I've got plenty of the original safeplates left, they're about 1mm or so. Certainly strong enough to resist a floorboard nail. You could probably get a hardened screw through one, but it would take a while & you'd realise something wasn't right!!
 27 January 2013 07:10 AM
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Avatar for ebee.
ebee

Posts: 5698
Joined: 02 December 2004

I`ve never used "safe plates" and always assumed they were 3mm thick or so.
OK it wouldn`t stop some nail guns etc but might help if someone is trying to hammer a nail in. Better than metal capping which in my mind will not stop a nail or screw.

Mate of mine doing a rewire but leaving existing (fairly recent) kitchen wiring.

Some joists above the kitchen are notched for cables so he bought a few plates to add protection. They were thinner than I imagined they might be (0.9mm)

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 27 January 2013 10:10 PM
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Martynduerden

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I just cannot see how safe plates of less than 2mm offer any protection, if a piece of metal is wedged between two chunks of timber then hammering a nail through the floorboard would surely just pierce it, the metal cannot move which I woul think makes it far less resistant to puncture especially from a swinging hammer....

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Martyn.

Only a mediocre person is always at their best



www.electrical contractors uk.com
 27 January 2013 10:35 PM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7232
Joined: 18 April 2006

I've posted about these plates ages ago and I recall suggesting that the manufacturer was asked if he'd confirm their compliance with BS 7671 applications........

I understand that the Gas organisation specified a thickness in their guide dating from the mid 90's so leading to the assumption that if it were good enough for the pipe stranglers, it was good enough for the wire pullers without reading BS 7671

Regards

BOD
 27 January 2013 10:41 PM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7232
Joined: 18 April 2006

Found this:

21 April 2006 08:47 PM perspicacious

Tried to find the source of the 2" rule quoted, but no luck. Can you ask for the source and reply in this topic? However, it may have its origins in GN 1 2nd ed 1996 p62+63 which states that Regulation 522-06-05 requires cables to be at least 50 mm from the surface all along the route, if they are to be unprotected, not just at joists. GN 1 3rd ed 1999 p75 states that It is good practice to ensure thst the 50 mm is maintained along the whole route as nails or screws are a similiar size all along the route. GN 1 4th ed 2004 p91 makes no reference to the route being protected but states Unless purpose manufactured plates are used effective protection is very difficult to achieve bearing in mind the modern fixings such as self-tapping screws and shot-fired nails that are available. I recall that CORGI actually committed themseles to a gauge of plate for their compliance and these plates became commonplace for electrical work without installers realising that 522-06-05 is a performance requirement, not prescriptive as CORGI. I cannot put my hand on the CORGI book of that vintage at the moment. Perhaps someone can quote the CORGI history?
Regards
BOD


Regards

BED
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