IET logo
 
IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: bathroom in line extractor fan
Topic Summary:
Created On: 16 January 2013 11:32 PM
Status: Post and Reply
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
1 2 Next Last unread
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 16 January 2013 11:32 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



robark

Posts: 21
Joined: 10 January 2011

Isolation for inline bathroom extractor fans. Where do others put the isolation switch for the fan ?? I know some people put a 3 pole switch above the bathroom door etc.. I was thinking about putting a switched fcu, fed off permanent feed off lights in loft next to fan, the fcu will feed a MF joint box. The joint box will feed a switch for fan in\outside bathroom, and a 3 core to fan. Surely this complies. I have been looking in regs, and can't see any reasons not to do it like this. Any thoughts ??
 17 January 2013 12:03 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



antric2

Posts: 1055
Joined: 20 October 2006

You are correct.The FCU can be put in the loft next to fan therefore complying with regs because all isolators are supposed to be within sight of person doing maintenance or if out of sight then they must be lockable type.
regards
Antric
 17 January 2013 10:29 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6210
Joined: 04 July 2007

I think this is a good way of doing it, in fact I done one just like this yesterday and have another to do on Saturday. The only disadvantage I can see is that when the fcu is switched off the bathroom light goes out as well. (you could also fit a 3 pole isolator just for the fan)
This does sort out the 3 amp fuse that some fan makers stipulate. The one I fitted yesterday was an Xpelair which didn't mention an fcu although it did show an in-line fuse on the instruction sheet but no mention of it in the text and also no amperage shown either although it did stipulate a DP switch, so I think the switched fcu works fine, DP switch and fuse,

Dave.,

Edited: 17 January 2013 at 11:50 AM by daveparry1
 17 January 2013 02:05 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for zeeper.
zeeper

Posts: 1409
Joined: 11 July 2008

Surely this complies


Why can't you use the mcb as Isolator, hows the in-line extractor any different from a light fitting. Its a load attached to the circuit.

You dont have isolators for each light
 17 January 2013 03:11 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6210
Joined: 04 July 2007

Manufacturers instructions Zeeper! (I agree unnecessary just like the 3 amp fuse even when connected to a 6 amp mcb)

Dave.
 17 January 2013 05:10 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



AJJewsbury

Posts: 11467
Joined: 13 August 2003

You dont have isolators for each light

You do, usually, have a means for individually switching off for mechanical maintenance though.
- Andy.
 17 January 2013 05:26 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for spinlondon.
spinlondon

Posts: 4439
Joined: 10 December 2004

I assume it all depends on what the isolator is intended for.
If it's for functional switching, then having it in the loft is not very practical.
If it's for maintenance, then fine, although is it strictly necessary (not actually aware of any Regulation requiring the point of isolation having to be within sight).
If it's for emergency switching, then again having it in the loft is not very practical, most likely wouldn't comply and the SFCU would have to comply with the requirements for emergency switches, I.e. the switch should be red.
 17 January 2013 05:41 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



impvan

Posts: 769
Joined: 07 September 2005

For a loft fan i wouldn't even bother with the isolator. I use a 4-pole connector, ashley klik or similar, where i change from grey to flex.
 17 January 2013 07:17 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



robark

Posts: 21
Joined: 10 January 2011

The fcu is only fitted, because fan has to be down rated to 3amps. When fcu is switched off, it does not affect lights, as fcu is supplied from permanent feed off the lighting circuit. Outside the bathroom is a 2 gang switch, one for lights, one for fan. I hope this clears things up. What's the point of having extractor fan coming on with lights ? Bathroom has a window. If someone has a shower in the day, they won't want lights on as well, they can just turn fan on. The fan has a timer on it. I hope this is alright as I will be using it as part of my assessment, when I splash a shed load of cash and join a scheme.
 17 January 2013 07:45 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6210
Joined: 04 July 2007

What's the point of having extractor fan coming on with lights ?
---------------------
It is very common practice for the fan to come on with the lights and if it's a timer fan it needs either a 3 pole isolator or a switched fcu which isolates both the permanent live and the switched live, in this case it will isolate the light too!
 17 January 2013 08:22 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



robark

Posts: 21
Joined: 10 January 2011

The way I have wired it, when you switch the fcu off, it isolates the switched live and permanent live and neutral to fan. The lights will stay on as the fcu which feeds fan, via a joint box, is fed from the permanent live off the lighting circuit, not the switched live to the lights. That's why I have put a 2 gang light switch outside of bathroom. One to switch fan on, one to switch lights on.
 17 January 2013 08:30 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6210
Joined: 04 July 2007

That's ok if you want the fan to be able to operate independently of the light, no problem with that at all, in fact some customers want it that done way.
 17 January 2013 08:48 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



robark

Posts: 21
Joined: 10 January 2011

Yes that's right. When some people want the toilet in the middle of the night, they don't have to have the fan running and waking people up. I just wanted to make sure that this was acceptable for my assessment. 1, to have fcu in loft next to fan, and not above the bathroom door, and 2, having the fan switched on independently from the lights. Thanks for your advice.
 17 January 2013 11:22 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



aligarjon

Posts: 2837
Joined: 09 September 2005

Originally posted by: robark

Yes that's right. When some people want the toilet in the middle of the night, they don't have to have the fan running and waking people up. I just wanted to make sure that this was acceptable for my assessment. 1, to have fcu in loft next to fan, and not above the bathroom door, and 2, having the fan switched on independently from the lights. Thanks for your advice.


i got picked up on this by a building inspector a few years ago, he said it was a requirement that the bathroom fan came on with the light.
i changed it then changed it back after he left at the request of the customer.

i have mine seperate at home for the reason you said, who wants the fan running at night if you get up to the toilet, especially in an en-suite.

It might have changed now because the building inspector didn't mention it, although i did flick both switches on together when he wanted to check the fan operation.

Gary

-------------------------
Specialised Subject. The Bleedin Obvious. John Cleese
 18 January 2013 07:33 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Fm

Posts: 675
Joined: 24 August 2011

Write your o and m manual for the customer the way you have wired your lights.!
 18 January 2013 07:12 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



CMD

Posts: 198
Joined: 17 November 2008

Hi

You can get fans with a selectable time delay so it wont come on straight away if your in the toilet in the middle of the night if linked to the lighting that is.
 18 January 2013 07:35 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for eclectica.
eclectica

Posts: 63
Joined: 16 August 2010

In a cottage last year I wired up an inline fan and as well as having a fan isolator outside the bathroom, I put one in the very accessible loft as well so that the occupants could be sure of isolation for cleaning etc.

Ok, a bit belt and braces, but what the heck for another few £? Everyone appreciates safety, especially if you point it out - I think.

-------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The meaning of life is a blank sheet; write on it wisely. ~ M.Cutler.
 18 January 2013 07:43 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6210
Joined: 04 July 2007

You can get fans with a selectable time delay
------------------
I've never seen one with delay start CMD, only timed run-on,

Dave.
 18 January 2013 07:57 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



GJH

Posts: 501
Joined: 24 January 2008

I always fit a fan isolator next to the inline fan in the loft and one above the Bathroom door for a wall mounted type.
 18 January 2013 08:34 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for M.Joshi.
M.Joshi

Posts: 212
Joined: 10 January 2003

Originally posted by: daveparry1

I've never seen one with delay start CMD, only timed run-on,



Dave.


Dave, most of the common extractor fan brands have models or bolt-on options for delayed start to allow for short visits. Some of the brands that do are: Vent-Axia, Airflow and Xpelair.

This is in addition to the timed run-on.

-------------------------
M.I.E.T - Forfeited this due to The I.E.T's ridiculous membership rules!
IET » Wiring and the regulations » bathroom in line extractor fan

1 2 Next Last unread
Topic Tools Topic Tools
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.