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Topic Title: Sockets in bathrooms
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Created On: 09 January 2013 09:00 PM
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 10 January 2013 12:58 PM
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Frankmul

Posts: 20
Joined: 10 December 2012

Originally posted by: rogerbryant

Originally posted by: westfield6



At the end of the day we are superior to them. We ban sockets in bathrooms, we drive on the correct side of the road, we have polarised mains sockets, we have water tanks as a backup against supply failures, we have traffic lights with an amber phase, and we speak the de-facto international language English.





The UK also has fused plugs which overheat/melt if used at their rated current :-)



http://www.theiet.org/forums/f...7&enterthread=y



Best regards



Roger


Is that not down to the manufacturers running close to the limits on the material in the products. I would say that a euro plug manufactured to the same standards would also overheat and melt.
 10 January 2013 01:33 PM
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ebee

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"The next big meeting planned in the EU regarding IEC 60364 will stretch over 2014/2015 and this time will involve the NEC. "

NEC ? NEC?

There`s Rock again with his abbreviations!

National Exhibition Centre?



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Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 10 January 2013 04:02 PM
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rocknroll

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Originally posted by: ebee

"The next big meeting planned in the EU regarding IEC 60364 will stretch over 2014/2015 and this time will involve the NEC. "

NEC ? NEC?

There`s Rock again with his abbreviations!

National Exhibition Centre?



Sorry, the NEC (National Electric Code) published by the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) a mandatory code specific to N America and the countries that have adopted it, in a lot of cases countries that are split up into regions or provinces could have both systems in operation so discussions will be how the two can be integrated.

IEC 60364 is based on the principle of 'increased touch voltage' but since the advances over the last 40 years especially now the extensive use of RCD's our designs are now concentrating more on the principle of 'increased fault current' which aligns with the NEC.

regards

-------------------------
"Take nothing but a picture,
leave nothing but footprints!"
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"Oh! The drama of it all."
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"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
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 10 January 2013 04:52 PM
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ebee

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Yes I thought it was the USA one but just needed to check with you.
We have to become more like America in every way.LOL.

Let`s redeclare our voltages again to !000V +/- 100% then a lot more will be harmonised at the stroke of a pen.

"World Voltage Day"

-------------------------
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Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 10 January 2013 04:54 PM
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ebee

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As soon as we get everyone to call them RCDs instead of GFCI and we make ring finals universally practised then get everyone to drive on the proper side of the road like us then I reckon we got it mostly cracked.

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Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 10 January 2013 10:37 PM
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MrOther

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Originally posted by: westfield6

At the end of the day we are superior to them. We ban sockets in bathrooms, we drive on the correct side of the road, we have polarised mains sockets, we have water tanks as a backup against supply failures, we have traffic lights with an amber phase, and we speak the de-facto international language English.


This forum needs a like button.
 10 January 2013 11:24 PM
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M.Joshi

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Originally posted by: MrOther

This forum needs a like button.


I remember asking the moderator a while back when the forums would be updated. TheIET seem to be using a very old forum system which doesn't even allow picture attachments or likes/dislikes!

Don't know what's stopping them from updating the forum to a modern version as used on other websites?

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M.I.E.T - Forfeited this due to The I.E.T's ridiculous membership rules!
 01 March 2013 09:48 AM
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baldwinsmith

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Joined: 01 March 2013

The Textbathrooms has come along way in the past one hundred years. Once just a basic tub set in front of the living room fire and filled with buckets of water, the bathing experience is now a luxury in almost every western home. Back then, a "bathroom" was something only the wealthy and privileged could afford to have in their house
 01 March 2013 07:08 PM
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frspikeyhead

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Unfortunately we pay alot more tax.
 02 March 2013 10:07 AM
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Legh

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I think that most methods of control used in 'special locations' or in this case within zone 2 or just outside, of a bathroom are designed to be able to disconnect safely.
BS1363 plugs and sockets, are not IMO suitable for the environment. At least Schuko sockets have a greater degree of protection due to their recessed design.

Since a plug socket combination are used primarily for isolation I would think it unwise to handle such a device with wet or damp hands in an environment with above average humidity. and of course the fact that an application of an extension lead will allow the user to import an appliance within zone 1.

There are alternatives. The use of switched fused spurs where portable appliances are hard wired.

Legh

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 04 March 2013 02:48 PM
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AJJewsbury

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At least Schuko sockets have a greater degree of protection due to their recessed design.

Haven't BS 1363 plugs "caught up" on that score since the introduction of sleeved L+N pins?
- Andy.
 04 March 2013 05:45 PM
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Legh

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Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

At least Schuko sockets have a greater degree of protection due to their recessed design.


Haven't BS 1363 plugs "caught up" on that score since the introduction of sleeved L+N pins?

- Andy.


I think they are different. The housing to the Schuko sockets are completely shrouded, well some of them are, but the BS1363 socket plug combinations are flat faced. So moisture can sit between the plug and socket and may ingress along the pins into the socket.

That doesn't mean I'm in favour of our European cousins' design, far from it particularly when the European model will fall apart in your hands.....

Legh

-------------------------
Why do we need Vernier Calipers when we have container ships?

http://www.leghrichardson.co.uk

"Science has overcome time and space. Well, Harvey has overcome not only time and space - but any objections."
 05 March 2013 08:20 AM
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MPVaughan

Posts: 104
Joined: 07 August 2010

In Australia socket outlets are permitted >0.3m away from the edge of a fixed sink though must be 30mA protected.

-No KO / dry line boxes required for accessories, can screw direct to wooden cabinetry, stud walls etc

-T&E on every job - commercial, domestic, industrial

-Metal containment cut with a grinder

-Adiabatic? Whats that??!

- 6mm2 main earth and bonding with 25mm tails

Reckon id struggle to work in the UK again, the boil in the bag brigade would be better than me.

You boys worry too much!!!
IET » Wiring and the regulations » Sockets in bathrooms

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