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Topic Title: Part F
Topic Summary: Recirculation mode of kitchen extractor fan
Created On: 09 January 2013 10:15 AM
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 09 January 2013 10:15 AM
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unshockable

Posts: 853
Joined: 18 May 2007

Straw pole; anyone hold with the above and carbon filters? When I googled, no consumer was happy with the job done.

My customer wants to remove cooking smells and the extractor hood would be on an internal wall with no chance of ducting outside. I think this is a waste of time and money.

I think I have one chance, to core 6", the wall, 2.5m in a straight line from the hob. The fan will then be 600mm below the ceiling height due to construction.

Will a decent fan do this job in that position? Timer overrun, is that a good idea?

Also I will be using a shuttered fan on this 2nd floor flat but the fan will be venting to a point between the boiler flue and a 4" stack top vent(possible foul smells?). Can anyone advise on minimum distances please?

Thanks
Simon

Edited: 09 January 2013 at 11:27 AM by unshockable
 09 January 2013 12:32 PM
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alanblaby

Posts: 394
Joined: 09 March 2012

You've got no choice about an extractor fan if Building regs are involved. Recirculating fans are not extracting, so if you fit one of those, you will also need an extractor.
If you have extraction above the cooker, then it's 30L/second. Anywhere else in the room means a 60L/sec fan.
 09 January 2013 01:26 PM
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rocknroll

Posts: 8887
Joined: 03 October 2005

Generally cooker hoods in recirculation mode tend to work quite well, the problem being that people do not chuck the grease filters in the dishwasher each week or renew the charcoal filters on a regular basis.

If there is a balanced flue there is no min distance apart from the guidance that if within 300mm then the fan must not be reversible and have shutters, if the stack is in good repair then there should not be any smells, if the top is near you can always stick a carbon filter on the top.

(From a regulations point of view if the stack pipe is within 3 metres of the window then it must extend to at least 900mm above the top of the window).

It might be worth checking that the window has trickle vents otherwise the fan might not extract much in the way of cooking smells in a flat.

regards

-------------------------
"Take nothing but a picture,
leave nothing but footprints!"
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"Oh! The drama of it all."
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"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
-------------------------

Edited: 09 January 2013 at 01:51 PM by rocknroll
 09 January 2013 02:28 PM
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unshockable

Posts: 853
Joined: 18 May 2007

@ AlanBaby
This is an existing kitchen finished by the previous owner. The new owner wants a solution to the cooking smells.

@Rocknroll
Thanks for that. This is an open plan area in a leaky Victorian conversion and I'm sure the air can be replaced.
 09 January 2013 03:08 PM
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alanblaby

Posts: 394
Joined: 09 March 2012

Well if they just want the smells gone, then a carbon filter hood will help. As said above, the filters do need to be either cleaned, or changed regularly. I fitted some recently from Ikea which could be washed in washing up water, dried, then re-used.

They do not get rid of steam.
 09 January 2013 09:11 PM
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sparkingchip

Posts: 6278
Joined: 18 January 2003

Can you squeeze one of these in?

Andy
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