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Topic Title: switch in a bathroom
Topic Summary: just add rcd ?
Created On: 08 January 2013 07:43 PM
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 08 January 2013 07:43 PM
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ady1

Posts: 766
Joined: 19 April 2005

A small foyer area leads to the original bathroom (there probably was an interconnecting door, but that been removed).
I am only there to re-connect a new shower in the same position etc.
So I have allowed for an RCD for the shower.
Today they asked me to fit some suitable bathroom light fittings...
The light in the foyer and the light in the bathroom come off the same switch on the wall inside the foyer (well outside the zones - 2.6m actually)... which upon inspection, has no rcd.
So, am i correct to assume i can leave the switch where it is, but i must add rcd for that whole lighting circuit and not worry about the supp bonding as everything in there will then be RCD'd ?

Regards
Ady

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 08 January 2013 08:12 PM
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spinlondon

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As long as the circuits satisfy the requirements for ADS, are provided with 30mA RCD protection, and all extraneous-conductive-parts are effectively connected to the main bonding, supplementary bonding would not be required.
 08 January 2013 08:16 PM
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ady1

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You copy that out the book spin

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 08 January 2013 08:22 PM
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spinlondon

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No, I made it all up myself.
 08 January 2013 08:24 PM
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ady1

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ok mate, thanks
only messin.

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 08 January 2013 08:29 PM
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AJJewsbury

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and all extraneous-conductive-parts are effectively connected to the main bonding

That's the tricky one. With the traditional British hot water system - with hot water supplied at low pressure from a cylinder supplied from a plastic supply tank, there's often no direct connection between the hot water pipework and the main bonding (the plastic tank gets in the way).
- Andy.
 08 January 2013 08:31 PM
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spinlondon

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Not that tricky.
Nothing a bit of supplementary bonding won't sort out.
 08 January 2013 08:39 PM
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daveparry1

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Andy, I have a similar situation where there is a Megaflow system in use, would this mean all the pipework has continuity to the main incomer and bonding? (all pipework is copper)
Apologies for hi-jacking your thread Ady!

Dave.
 08 January 2013 09:12 PM
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colinhaggett

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Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

and all extraneous-conductive-parts are effectively connected to the main bonding


That's the tricky one. With the traditional British hot water system - with hot water supplied at low pressure from a cylinder supplied from a plastic supply tank, there's often no direct connection between the hot water pipework and the main bonding (the plastic tank gets in the way).

- Andy.


What about the metal boiler?

 08 January 2013 09:19 PM
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AJJewsbury

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What about the metal boiler?

Conventional system (non-combi) boilers don't have a direct connection to the cold water pipe - they're conventionally fed from another plastic feed & expansion tank, so unless someone has considered the heating flow & return pipes to be extraneous from the point of view of the entire installation (which they're usually not) and main bonded them, there's still no direct connection to the main bonding.
- Andy.
 08 January 2013 09:31 PM
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aligarjon

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Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

What about the metal boiler?


Conventional system (non-combi) boilers don't have a direct connection to the cold water pipe - they're conventionally fed from another plastic feed & expansion tank, so unless someone has considered the heating flow & return pipes to be extraneous from the point of view of the entire installation (which they're usually not) and main bonded them, there's still no direct connection to the main bonding.

- Andy.




You will probably get a connection through the gas bond.

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 08 January 2013 09:41 PM
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AJJewsbury

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You will probably get a connection through the gas bond.

Possibly, but we're banned from selecting gas (or oil) pipes as protective conductors (543.2.3)
- Andy.
 08 January 2013 10:02 PM
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colinhaggett

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Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

You will probably get a connection through the gas bond.


Possibly, but we're banned from selecting gas (or oil) pipes as protective conductors (543.2.3)

- Andy.


Might be the case, but its still present. Then again you won't leave it like that, just a bit of cross bonding in the airing cupboard if your lucky.

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