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Topic Title: Electric heating advice
Topic Summary: 1980's flat
Created On: 08 December 2012 12:44 PM
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 08 December 2012 12:44 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 1818
Joined: 14 December 2006

I rarely get involved with electric heating so would be grateful for advice from anyone more up to speed on this.

1980's 2 bedroom flat, no gas, recent purchase by young couple.

Panel heaters in bedrooms and hall, fan heater in bathroom, all working fine.

No heating in sitting room or kitchen.

In sitting room there is a DP switch on the off-peak supply with a FCU adjacent to it on 24 hour supply, all connected and functional.

In the kitchen there is a high level FCU which looks like it once had some kind of panel heater fitted to it.

Any thoughts on what to fit in the sitting room and kitchen.
Kitchen is the coldest room.

Mike
 08 December 2012 01:58 PM
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OMS

Posts: 19895
Joined: 23 March 2004

Block storage heater in the sitting room with an on peak panel integrated - making use of the on peak and off peak.

Consider swapping the bedroom panels for NSH to maximise the off peak tarrif

Ditto the HWS immersion(s)

Fan convector in kitchen for rapid warm up - or again fins a gap for a NSH

Regards

OMS

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Failure is always an option
 08 December 2012 02:21 PM
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alancapon

Posts: 5831
Joined: 27 December 2005

In my last house, I fitted a fan heater in the plinth of one of the kitchen base units. It gave adequate heat, and had a flush-mounted control unit that fitted on the wall that gave three options for heatings (four if you also include the fan with no heat). The unit I used was made by Dimplex.

Regards,

Alan.
 08 December 2012 02:28 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 1818
Joined: 14 December 2006

Originally posted by: OMS

Block storage heater in the sitting room with an on peak panel integrated - making use of the on peak and off peak.

(Sounds good)


Consider swapping the bedroom panels for NSH to maximise the off peak tarrif

(No off-peak outlets in bedrooms or hall)


Ditto the HWS immersion(s)

(Already dual element)


Fan convector in kitchen for rapid warm up - or again fins a gap for a NSH

(No off-peak outlet, but a fan convector with a timer might be the way to go)


Regards



OMS[/q
There are only two off-peak circuits, one supplies the sitting room, the other the lower immersion element.

Many thanks, Mike
 08 December 2012 02:37 PM
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OMS

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But the tarriff changes for the whole supply ? - if so, fit local timeclocks to match the E7 time schedule for the bedroom heaters - you can get integral timers on some models

Regards

OMS

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Failure is always an option
 08 December 2012 06:34 PM
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slittle

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Originally posted by: alancapon

In my last house, I fitted a fan heater in the plinth of one of the kitchen base units. It gave adequate heat, and had a flush-mounted control unit that fitted on the wall that gave three options for heatings (four if you also include the fan with no heat). The unit I used was made by Dimplex.



Regards,



Alan.


The house we've moved into has as electric one under one of the units as the kitchen doesn't have enough wall space for a radiator. I have to say I was impressed by the heat output.

I might get advanced enough to control it via a stat (and possibly a contactor as most stats only seem to do 3 amps these days) to avoid having to make my breakfast in a chilly kitchen


Stu
 08 December 2012 07:25 PM
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jcm256

Posts: 1938
Joined: 01 April 2006

These are supposed to be good, only seen them in an electrical showroom, look good but at a price.

(See how it works)

http://www.greenvisionheating..../electric_tariffs.html
 08 December 2012 08:40 PM
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dickllewellyn

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A lot of wholesalers won't sell those anymore jcm. They have been done by trading standards a few times too. They claim to have some kind of magic fluid in them that breaks the rule of putting a kilowatt in and getting a kilowatt out!

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Regards
Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
 08 December 2012 09:47 PM
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jcm256

Posts: 1938
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Dick, thanks for that, that is where I seen them at an electrical wholesalers, they had a set up with tank and all on show. Although balked at the price thought German make must be good. Local petrol station proprietor and myself was talking about the number of people coming in with plastic five/ten gallon cans for home heating oil, now a big seller. People cannot afford to pay for a 500L or 900L fill of oil (no gas in this area).
Myself although had a long standing order with oil company always paid up before next fill, company cancelled (and others) and you must pay up front now for an oil fill.
This is the worst recession I have ever seen, cannot see the green deal golden rule ever working. My own house I have done all I can with double roof space lagging, wall lagged double glazing the lot, But in this cold climate we have now the house still freezing and oil goes down like a rocket, which is why I thank you for telling me that about the radiators. I am going now to get half a dozen plastic cans although this is the most costly way to buy home heating oil and it goes down your sleeve when you put it in the tank. Save up all you can now when you have plenty of work, because someday you will need plenty of cash for oil or gas, and to pay for the million by then costly wind turbines.


Regards
jcm
 08 December 2012 10:07 PM
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leckie

Posts: 2012
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Dimplex took them to court I think. Dimplex now make a big point on there web site about 1kw in 1kw out, ie 100 percent efficient.

Trouble with storage heaters in bedrooms and rooms not used for long periods, is that although the unit costs are less you have less control. So you tend to need them on for more hours per day on average in order to have heat when you want it. So you might use just as much energy as point of use type heaters. Look at the rule of thumb values of kw/sq.m given for each type of heaters by creda, etc. They reckon to allow nearly double for storage types compared to direct heating. Sort of cancels things out
 09 December 2012 06:51 AM
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normcall

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Joined: 15 January 2005

Think of storage heaters as piling up the days output overnight.
As a rough guide, if the heat/loss calculations show a room needs 1Kw per hour, then you need 24K per day. Divide by the usual 7 (hours off peak) and a 3.6Kw is the minimum, although I would rather install two 2+Kw myself.
Our bedrooms have 'background' night storage heaters which have the capacity to provide 'comfort' levels if someone is ill.

My 'wendy house' up the garden also has a NSH, with a time-switch set to our off peak times - works well!

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Norman
 10 December 2012 11:00 AM
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rosemarie

Posts: 5
Joined: 10 December 2012

Hallo Everyone.
I am Rose, And I am new here. I hope for participating here. So My parents buy houses and let them out and they said they would buy a place for me and i could rent it off them. Its not an old flat i don't think because it said on the leaflet that it still had part of an Nhbc Guarantee left on it.

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[url=Link removed/]Gas Furnace Replacement Parts[/url]
 10 December 2012 11:39 AM
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rocknroll

Posts: 8902
Joined: 03 October 2005

FYI;

The NHBC warranty does not relate to consumer rights but build quality.

For the first two years it covers the builder/contractors who did the work.

From the third to the tenth year it covers only the structural element.

If any major refurbishment takes place during the ten years the warranty becomes void.

If you have any concerns that relate to the build quality the NHBC offer a mediation service.

Hope this helps.

regards

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"Take nothing but a picture,
leave nothing but footprints!"
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"Oh! The drama of it all."
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"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
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Edited: 10 December 2012 at 11:53 AM by rocknroll
 10 December 2012 01:52 PM
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geov

Posts: 203
Joined: 22 February 2004

Has anyone had experience of German manufactured infra red heaters - they were being described to me the other day, though I have yet to see them or a completed install?
I'll post up a web site when I have the details.
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