IET logo
 
IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: 2396 exams
Topic Summary: views
Created On: 06 December 2012 11:34 PM
Status: Post and Reply
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
1 2 3 Next Last unread
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 06 December 2012 11:34 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



aargeitakis

Posts: 141
Joined: 14 July 2005

Hi

I had the 2396 exams tonight. I want to believe that I passed it but I have to wait for the results.
I found the paper ok but time was not long enough as usual.
I would like to see some other views.
Good luck and good results to everybody who took the exams tonight.

Regards

Paul
 07 December 2012 05:22 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for leckie.
leckie

Posts: 1806
Joined: 21 November 2008

I've been reading about this course and would like to do it but I've just looked and it's costs £840 which is a lot of dosh. When it says level 4 what does that mean exactly?

Other than the educational benifits, is there any advantages this course offers. For example is it recognised by the jib for any grading level, etc?

As self employed I don't need to do the course but if I can justify the cost I would fancy doing it. I haven't done a project since my c course 35 years ago!

Edited: 07 December 2012 at 05:46 AM by leckie
 07 December 2012 07:22 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for spinlondon.
spinlondon

Posts: 4437
Joined: 10 December 2004

Did you have a question about the two methods to confirm continuity of bonding conductors, or is that from the 2395?
 07 December 2012 08:42 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for ebee.
ebee

Posts: 5684
Joined: 02 December 2004

What is the answer to the bonding question Spin?

Do you check for Multiple bonds?

Protective Multiple Bonding - now there`s a term!

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 07 December 2012 08:51 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



alanblaby

Posts: 356
Joined: 09 March 2012

2396 - well worth it.
Makes you think about things, and it does show up errors in your day to day work.
I found the exam really hard, 2391 was easy in comparison.
The project takes a lot of time, and, again, makes you think far more than you would normally do, and, shows how wrong you can be if you just use what you normally use - do the calcs, and suddenly a typical T+E cable is not large enough, or is far too large etc.

ETS in Birmingham do it for around £600 iirc, I'd recommend them to do it, a very good course.
 07 December 2012 09:12 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Parsley.
Parsley

Posts: 993
Joined: 04 November 2004

Is this course actually any different from the 2400 I sat 11 years ago. I believe the C course was a lot more technical Leckie, so you shouldn't have any problems.

Regards
 07 December 2012 10:03 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for spinlondon.
spinlondon

Posts: 4437
Joined: 10 December 2004

Originally posted by: ebee
What is the answer to the bonding question Spin?
Do you check for Multiple bonds?
Protective Multiple Bonding - now there`s a term!

Seems the question was asked in the 2395, not the 2396.
I believe the answer is to test for end to end continuity using a long lead if necessary.
Or if the clamps are not visible, then check between points on the metallic pipework, looking for a reading of 0.05Ω or lower.

Some apparently answered that the second method was to visually examine the length of the conductor.
 07 December 2012 10:41 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Legh.
Legh

Posts: 3483
Joined: 17 December 2004

I remember having the option of either the C course or an ONC in Building services. The C course appeared to go nowhere, but the ONC lead onto the HNC and higher.

I don't see a progression route at present with the 2396. Perhaps the HNC in building services?

Eventually ended up teaching some C course material. It was a useful course to teach if nothing else.

Legh

-------------------------
Why do we need Vernier Calipers when we have container ships?

http://www.leghrichardson.co.uk

"Science has overcome time and space. Well, Harvey has overcome not only time and space - but any objections."
 07 December 2012 11:14 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Parsley.
Parsley

Posts: 993
Joined: 04 November 2004

The C course was hard, I did it when I was a 3rd year apprentice one long day at college 9 till 9. I thought it would be an easy day, get up late, go to the pub at lunchtime etc. I found the maths really difficult, that was over 20 years ago, I still look at my science and calculations books Maurice Lewis books every now and then.

From memory the C course project was more or less the same as the 2400.

Regards
 07 December 2012 11:33 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19628
Joined: 23 March 2004

Originally posted by: Parsley

Is this course actually any different from the 2400 I sat 11 years ago. I believe the C course was a lot more technical Leckie, so you shouldn't have any problems.

Regards


Technically, it's not so different - the exam is the usual rush of getting stuff down on paper but it does cover pretty much everything you need at level 4, albeit the answers are a bit "stock"

The project is pretty similar

Overall, the award suffers (in my opinion) from being a stand alone module, with others - so the 2396 is supposed to be a design course - but it needs endless duplication of what is effectively the same material, presented differently in different parts of the question/brief.

It's the usual C&G hotch potch of crap questions and no direction in those questions to determine what the candidate knows about design.

It would benefit from a couple of hard nosed front line engineers undertaking the assignments and giving some pretty brutal feedback to C&G.

It's a good course but not focused enough on design to seperate it from testing and verification modules. It focuses on simple repetitive calculation without getting the candidate to do any "design" thinking. It lacks the rigour that's needed to allow you to determine Ib and select a cable type - it rushes straight into the cable calcs.

Further, it does not step outside the electrical arena in as much as there is little there relating to load estimation, maximum demand etc which will also need to capture mech services loads and an understanding of what the users of such a building type will want/need/like. I suspect there is nothing stopping a candidate doing the above - just that the process doesn't seem to require it.

If you've done 2400 I wouldn't bother - equally, if you can get access to, or get a job with, engineering designers, do that instead - you'll learn more.

If you did a C certificate course, again, don't bother - the C course was technically much more demanding than 2396.

That said, it's a current qualification, and with it's partners would be a suitable jumping off point for a HNC/HND or foundation degree.

Just my view of course

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 07 December 2012 11:55 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Delbot321

Posts: 77
Joined: 06 November 2012

I've been reading this post with interest as to weather I should look into 2396.

I did C course 25 years ago and as has already been said I struggled with the maths - although it was interesting and useful.

I did the 2400 about 10 years ago and thought it a bit of a breeze - probably because I'd done the C course.

Basically the C course consisted of an electrical principles paper, a regulations paper and a project.

The 2400 was much the same regulations paper and project without the electrical principles part which is where all the complex maths was. The 2400 also has a practical assessment on testing but you could be excused this if you had passed 2391.

Thanks to OMS for his comparison - don't think I'm going to bother with 2396 but if it is anything like the 2400 it is well worth doing this level of qualification as it starts to make you think about your designs in a much more structured way.
 07 December 2012 12:51 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19628
Joined: 23 March 2004

As I said - just my view

It's a good course if you haven't done anything like it previously - C course, 2400 or a HNC/HND project module.

If you are without the above, then for sure - leap in and give it a go - if you can get it for five or six hundred notes and have access to someone who will act as a bit of a sounding board (plenty of people on here would be willing, I'm sure) and can give up say 150 hours in order to make a good fist of it then why not

Any learning is good learning - and if your formative years are, shall we say, getting lost in the timeline of life, then again, it's probably worth doing.

It's a good course - just not delivering what I would want out of it for front line design

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 07 December 2012 03:46 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for leckie.
leckie

Posts: 1806
Joined: 21 November 2008

As i said I did the C course 35 years ago, the regs book waas the 14th edition!

I did 2391 a few years ago but i would quite like a modern day top up, though its a bit steep in my area

I also did the HNC but flunked the final exam I passed power engineering and control engineering but missed the theory by 2%. I was having some love life problems at the time and had my head up my a**e. Unfortunately that meant you had to do the whole year again and retake the lot. I was already self employed and just couldn't do it. I always regreted it though as I was one of only a few to come via the C course and missed a golden oppertunity. The maths for HNC was blooming hard, miles harder than anything on the C course, calculus was super hard, for me anyway. Ive still got my Shepherd Morton and Spence text book and K A Stroud Engineering mathmatics. They were in parchment back then
 07 December 2012 04:23 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19628
Joined: 23 March 2004

Ive still got my Shepherd Morton and Spence text book and K A Stroud Engineering mathmatics.


Me too - and you're not kidding about the sums.

Might be an idea if you blagged a copy of the exam paper for the written and got sight of the project brief - spend an evening looking through it - if you're honest about it, you'll know if it's worth doing or if it's just getting a badge for the sake of it. There's several on here that did the first iteration of the 2396

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 07 December 2012 04:24 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Parsley.
Parsley

Posts: 993
Joined: 04 November 2004

Originally posted by: leckie

As i said I did the C course 35 years ago, the regs book waas the 14th edition!



I did 2391 a few years ago but i would quite like a modern day top up, though its a bit steep in my area



I also did the HNC but flunked the final exam I passed power engineering and control engineering but missed the theory by 2%. I was having some love life problems at the time and had my head up my a**e. Unfortunately that meant you had to do the whole year again and retake the lot. I was already self employed and just couldn't do it. I always regreted it though as I was one of only a few to come via the C course and missed a golden oppertunity. The maths for HNC was blooming hard, miles harder than anything on the C course, calculus was super hard, for me anyway. Ive still got my Shepherd Morton and Spence text book and K A Stroud Engineering mathmatics. They were in parchment back then


I didn't go any further after the C course because I knew my mathematical limitations. I also don't think I knew enough about the industry at that age (19-20) to appreciate what I would have been taught at the next level. I went back to college when I was around 30 to do the 2391 and 2400 and found it pretty straight forward.

Regards
 07 December 2012 04:30 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Legh.
Legh

Posts: 3483
Joined: 17 December 2004

@Leckie...Its strange the pictures one builds up of people just by reading their posts. I would have never thought you'd be in you mid fifties...
I reckon that all that information is still tucked away in your top paddock and with just a little of the right fertilizer, the flowers will begin to grow again.....

Legh

-------------------------
Why do we need Vernier Calipers when we have container ships?

http://www.leghrichardson.co.uk

"Science has overcome time and space. Well, Harvey has overcome not only time and space - but any objections."
 07 December 2012 04:56 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



John Peckham

Posts: 7423
Joined: 23 April 2005

Does anyone have a copy of lats nights paper they could send to me?

As for comparison Jobbo has all the past qualifications C, 2400 and 2391_20 and the 2396 so he should be able provide a comparison.

-------------------------
John Peckham

http://www.astutetechnicalservices.co.uk/
 07 December 2012 05:14 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for leckie.
leckie

Posts: 1806
Joined: 21 November 2008

Originally posted by: Legh

@Leckie...Its strange the pictures one builds up of people just by reading their posts. I would have never thought you'd be in you mid fifties...

I reckon that all that information is still tucked away in your top paddock and with just a little of the right fertilizer, the flowers will begin to grow again.....



Legh


Are my questions that stupid Legh?

Just turned 56yrs. One of the things that happens when you are doing similar contract types for years is that you brain gets out of practice for some of the theoretical bits and pieces ans you tend to use standard solutions. You spend a lot more time dealing with the business side, and you dont have the time to keep on the ball on the practical side. Over the last 10 months my business has changed completely, my choice, and I am no longer employing people so need to go back to basics and see what I fancy doing, which is not likely to involve knocking my pipe out too much! So, I am reading through books, asking stupid questions and trying to get back to speed for more general projects. Im also looking for courses suitable that may be useful. I think I am going to do the COMPEX exams for filling stations, two modules, costs about £1100 plus VAT. Ive read the Blue Book and been on a few periodics with a friend involved in testing filling stations. Quite interesting.
 07 December 2012 05:18 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Parsley.
Parsley

Posts: 993
Joined: 04 November 2004

Have you found any PME systems yet?

Regards
 07 December 2012 05:21 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Jobbo.
Jobbo

Posts: 912
Joined: 08 July 2010

You can't really compare the C Certificate with the other 3 as the guided learning hours between them are so great. My C was 2 years, the others being 5 days. What can you learn in 5 days you might ask? I would say they are more inline with CPD, so you already need a good understanding prior to starting. I did enjoy them all, as it refreshes your mind with certain aspects.

Totally agree with OMS, with his post above. Finding a training centre to deliver the course as intended is difficult and myself and JP found out. Only 3 out of the ten passed the course where we attended

John, how did your students do last last? We're they confident?

If your wondering why someone would do them all its simple, my employer paid.
IET » Wiring and the regulations » 2396 exams

1 2 3 Next Last unread
Topic Tools Topic Tools
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.