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Topic Title: Tv points ?
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Created On: 28 September 2012 05:13 PM
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 28 September 2012 05:13 PM
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goldenboy1818

Posts: 492
Joined: 22 February 2011

Hi about to start a new job and wanted some advice please. Clients talking about sky points and hd. What cabling would I need to put in place for this? Also iv heard about these central distribution devices there are, which allows you to run one cable down to each point, does anyone have any advice on these topics, would be greatly appreciated
 28 September 2012 05:38 PM
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mikejumper

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Originally posted by: goldenboy1818
Also iv heard about these central distribution devices there are, which allows you to run one cable down to each point,

Usually cable back to a common point from each outlet.
Then it's over to the aerial installer to fit the distribution box and aerial or dish.
I've used a guy for several years for this, he tells me what cables to install and then does the rest.
 28 September 2012 05:47 PM
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weirdbeard

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Joined: 26 September 2011

Hi, no real knowledge exactly, and happy to be corrected, but is it sky+ multi room they want with a box in each room? You can get splitters that will combine TV and sat signals down one cable but if you want sky+ I believe you will need 2 coaxs to each point from a central position. (I think a standard sky dish can support up to 4 sets of dual cables ) This allows you to watch one channel either freeveiw or sky with one cable and record a different channel with the other cable. The HD feed is then taken directly from the sat box to the TV.

edit: to be on the safe side, unless you have a TV man to refer to I'd probably run 3 coaxs to each point which would allow for normal aerial and 2 sat connections.
 28 September 2012 05:47 PM
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Martynduerden

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3 coax (ct100) to the main room 2 to all other points

4 to dish position

3 to Aerial on roof

Search for IRS

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 28 September 2012 07:45 PM
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slittle

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One cable to each point back to central location

At least two cables to the dish and one to tv aerial if you're having one.

And a phone line to central location.

I've got two sky+ boxes + freeview all down one cable to the tv location with the boxes away in a cupboard.

If you're going HD then a couple of cat5's to the tv locations will deal with that too.

Stu
 29 September 2012 10:49 PM
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lesboard

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TV (multi-media) points now involve more than just an aerial outlet. Basically every tuner needs a separate cable, so if you have satellite boxes which are capable of recording you need one for each tuner, i.e. two (or possibly three) per box and a quad LNB.

The LNB receives the signal in four different modes, horizontal, vertical and plus or minus voltage. The mode is selected by the tuner to suit the channel being watched or recorded.

If there are a total of more than four tuners in the house (probably two boxes) you need a switching amplifier. You run four cables from the LNB to the amplifier and two from the amplifier to each box (or one if you do not want to record). Most switching amps have inputs for terrestrial and cctv reception which can then be fed via the 'satellite' cables to a diplexer outlet where the signals are then separated before feeding the satellite box and TV.

If you want to watch iplayer type services via the TV you also need to feed a cat 5 cable from the router to a separate dedicated outlet adjacent to the TV. I think wireless options are becoming available but are probably not as good as cable. You should then be fully equipped for smart TV.

As far as digital terrestrial TV is concerned this follows the traditional analogue single coax cable distribution method which is amplified or split according to the signal strength and required number of outlets. You need to make sure you have wideband components and the outer conductor should be bonded to earth.

I looked into this when installing a TV system in my own house and decided to install a 20mm conduit to each outlet feeding one tuner and 25mm to each outlet feeding two tuners but as the situation is so fluid in hindsight 25mm throughout might have been preferable.

At the moment I am working in a state of the art building where a specialist contractor is installing two cat 6 cables and no coaxial to each outlet, so who knows what the future holds.
 29 September 2012 11:10 PM
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sparkingchip

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Regards retrofit, which option is best out of these two?

Ethernet over coax http://www.ethernetovercoax.co.uk/

Ethernet over power cables http://help.powerethernet.com/

Andy
 30 September 2012 08:28 AM
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primo

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Originally posted by: lesboard

the outer conductor should be bonded to earth.





Multi switches etc have a separate earth terminal on them. What is the purpose of this? Is it only needed when using an aeriel or is it to do with the possibility of introducing a potential into different flats properties through a common multi switch (if the set up feeds multiple flats rather than one house).
 30 September 2012 09:57 AM
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slittle

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The CAI have a great document on bonding. Can't remember the url for it. But it explains in aerial contractors speak why and when.

Think about leakage to the outer of the coax from all of the connected AV kit much of which is class 2 with Switch mode psu's.



Stu
 30 September 2012 10:10 AM
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primo

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Thanks Stu.
Back to the original question. I've just completed an install in a largish house that has 7 'AV/Data' points. Iv'e run 2 WF100 coax and 2 Cat5's to each point from a central location. There is a multi switch which has 4 WF100 coax to the dish with a quattro LNB. Hopefully this should cover most scenarios given that I had no spec to work from.

We'll see!

I like the sound of 2 Cat 6 only to each point. Sounds interesting.
 30 September 2012 02:36 PM
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AlanKay

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The multiswitch needs to have terrestrial input too; UHF/VHF(DAB)/FM, then you can use diplexer wallplates to deliver 2 x sat and all terrestrial down two lengths of WF100.
Or if you prefer, use one of the new SCR switchhes. These will provide, 2, 3 or even 4 independent Sat feeds down ONE WF100. You do need a compatible satellite receiver though - the latest Sky boxes will work.

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