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Topic Title: Economy seven
Topic Summary: What is involved
Created On: 28 September 2012 08:49 AM
Status: Post and Reply
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 28 September 2012 08:49 AM
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tillie

Posts: 789
Joined: 03 May 2006

Hi , I have just finished a one bedroom flat rewire.

I ran a new submain up from the intake position which is in a small cupboard at basement level.

The flat is in a large house ( Islington ) which is split into five flats all metered seperately from the basement room.

All is well but the occupier has now asked could they be put on an economy seven meter to deal with their Megaflo water heater.

At the moment I have it installed on two timeclocks ( dual element ) as asked by the developer.

I must admit that after 30 years in the trade I have never dealt with economy seven.

I have a 10.0mm 3 core swa running up to the flat without a hope of being able to run another one.

Am I right in thinking that I would need two swa cables up to the flat and two consumer units or is there a way around this.

All the economy seven will control is the Megaflow , the heating is supplied by five panel heaters with built in thermostats and timeclocks as requested.

Would there be two meters , I now feel a bit inadequate that I do not know the ins and outs of economy seven heating and I would like to know more whether they go ahead with this or not.

I actually suggested that because the existing set up is on two timeclocks , one which comes on overnight that they get cheap rate electricity anyway but I dont think ths fooled them.

Any info apprieciated.

Regards
 28 September 2012 09:00 AM
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OMS

Posts: 19747
Joined: 23 March 2004

The simple route for flats etc is just to get the meter operators to give an E7 tariff - two rate meter/timeclock.

The flat just has a single supply which is live 24/7 and is charged at the lower rate within the E7 (or E10) period.

In order to make use of the lower rate, the consumer just has timeclocks to operate his kit during low rate time slots.

What you've installed sounds OK to me

regards

OMS

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Failure is always an option
 28 September 2012 09:19 AM
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tillie

Posts: 789
Joined: 03 May 2006

Thanks for reply , so I could leave it as it is with the one sub main running up to the flat and get the meter changed to a dual tariff meter.

Why dont I know this ?

Would the set up in the intake room stay the same ie would it be a case of just swap the meter over ?

Regards
 28 September 2012 09:41 AM
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mikejumper

Posts: 1746
Joined: 14 December 2006

Originally posted by: tillie
Would the set up in the intake room stay the same ie would it be a case of just swap the meter over ?

It may already be a dual tariff meter.
 28 September 2012 10:59 AM
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tillie

Posts: 789
Joined: 03 May 2006

Hi , mikejumper it is definetely a standard meter.

It is an old numbered dial meter.

Regards
 28 September 2012 04:33 PM
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weirdbeard

Posts: 1579
Joined: 26 September 2011

Hi Tillie, is it a rental or owned flat? It's worth looking into the maths to find out if they will actually save money with E7, people think they are getting a good deal with a cheaper rate at night, but they are usually paying a premium on the day rates. The usual guidance is you need to be using more than 50% of your electric at night to benefit from E7 which is fine in the winter if you have a house full of storage heaters, but it's probably cheaper in general with a small installation to have a standard rate and only use the electric when it's needed with timers.
Unless it's a mega sized mega flow, it will probably only take half an hour to heat up fully from cold - it shouldn't take 7 hours!
 28 September 2012 04:56 PM
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Rulland

Posts: 473
Joined: 11 April 2008

As ^^^

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