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Topic Title: Lighting in disused building
Topic Summary: What lighting levels are required for the occasional personnel
Created On: 25 September 2012 11:26 AM
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 25 September 2012 11:26 AM
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Nosdivad

Posts: 2
Joined: 25 September 2012

Looking for lighting level requirement for a building that is no longer used. It is on occasion (six monthly basis) going to be subject to a check by personnel. Is it sufficient to give the personnel an appropriate torch or are there minimum lighting levels required for such a disused building?
 25 September 2012 12:59 PM
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Ricicle

Posts: 851
Joined: 23 October 2006

Will the checks be a security type glance or will they involve looking at detailed equipment such as alarm panels, heating controls etc as that will determine your levels I would have thought. What if there is an incident in between times that requires task lighting ?

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 25 September 2012 04:16 PM
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broadgage

Posts: 1357
Joined: 07 August 2007

Whilst there are minimum lighting levels for OCCUPIED buildings, IMHO this one does not count as occupied.

In general one should never rely for safety on a single source of light, whether this be a portable lantern or torch, or the public electricity supply.

If the premises has daylight, then a torch or lantern in addition should be sufficient.

If there is no daylight, or if the 6 monthly visits may be made during the hours of darkness, then something more is required

If an electricity supply supply is available, then I would install extremely basic mains powered lighting.
110 volt festoon lighting supplied from an isolating transformer is one option. Vistitors should be instructed to be equiped with a lantern or torch in addition, in case this fails.
Conventional emergency lighting is probably not suitable owing to the fact that it requires checking/maintaining more often than the planned visits.

If no electricity supply is available, then I feel it reasonable to rely on torches or lanterns. Each visitor should as a minimum have TWO independant light sources with them in case of failure.
A large high output flourescent lantern AND a pocket torch for EACH person would cover most needs.

I presume a minimum of two persons ?
If only a single worker, then I cant recomend this unless very low risk. If a person must venture ALONE into a disused building, then THREE light sources is not overdoing it, and two cellphones, and contacting base at frequent intervals.

If the 6 monthly inspection reveals the need for any significant work then it would be reasonable to make other arrangements such as hiring site lighting, and if needed also a generator.
All operatives engaged in these works should carry a torch in case the lighting fails.
 04 October 2012 09:02 AM
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Nosdivad

Posts: 2
Joined: 25 September 2012

Thank you for the responses. The area has an electrical system and currently has festoon lighting from transformer, my main concern was the overall lux level that would be required on all walkways where the festoon lighting does not reach. The intention was to turn this lighting on and go to these more remote parts of the building to see if the lux level is met.
 05 October 2012 04:08 PM
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broadgage

Posts: 1357
Joined: 07 August 2007

As a mains supply is available and festoon lighting is already used, I would add more festoon lighting in any areas where it is judged insufficient.
I do not think that any precise light level is required, more a case of "sufficient to avoid danger" could be as little as 2 lux on level surfaces and 10 times times that or even more in the vicinity of stairs , steps or other hazards.

Note that energy saving CFLs are now available in 110 volt, and can permit of a lot more lamps on one transformer.
Hardly justified to save energy, for twice a year use ! but can be cheaper than buying extra transformers.

Remember that this is totally reliant on the mains electricity supply, workers should carry at all times a suitable torch or lantern ready for instant use to avoid danger if the power fails.

A battery lantern can be turned on instantly, an oil one should be lit beforehand, dont count on trying to light it in the dark !.
 06 October 2012 03:06 PM
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weirdbeard

Posts: 1652
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Originally posted by: broadgage



A battery lantern can be turned on instantly, an oil one should be lit beforehand, dont count on trying to light it in the dark !.


There may also be noxious gases present, don't forget to take some seed to feed your canary, and also have an adequate length of string between two bean cans just incase there isn't network coverage for your newfangled wireless telegraphic communication devices!
 06 October 2012 05:29 PM
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ebee

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