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Topic Title: How does it work
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Created On: 17 June 2012 12:35 PM
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 17 June 2012 12:35 PM
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jcm256

Posts: 1861
Joined: 01 April 2006

How does this work, I don't know, but would like to know.

This woman plugs her car with the lead through the letterbox to a socket in the hall takes 24 hrs to charge her car, but can plug in for a rapid charge at a public charging point, which can do it in a hour. How does it work?

many of the new points are 'rapid charge' and can do it in an hour.



http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/m...o=feeds-newsxml


Is this the plug that does the job below/?

http://editorial.autos.msn.com...99-0c4c9ec1a243



Ah I got it add HV DC to the contact pins. (But not yet available).
CHAdeMO connector, developed in coordination with Tokyo Electric Power Company. SAE International is also working on a "hybrid connector" standard for fast charging that adds high-voltage DC power contact pins to the J1772 connector, enabling use of the same receptacle for all levels of charging. The new standard is expected to be available on vehicles in 2013.

Edited: 17 June 2012 at 01:20 PM by jcm256
 17 June 2012 11:02 PM
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westfield6

Posts: 114
Joined: 12 October 2007

When connected to a domestic supply the max charge is 13A or 3kW hour. Fast charge points are generally supplied from a 3 phase supply and can supply a lot more power.

I recently had a Nisson Leaf on a 24 hour test drive.Charging from a domestic supply was overnight. Using a fast charge point at a Nisson garage I could get 80% charge in an hour for the above reason. Having such a fast charge point at home was possible at a cost of £10K.
 18 June 2012 09:05 AM
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jcm256

Posts: 1861
Joined: 01 April 2006

Thanks for that reply; I thought that was the case, so the fast charge can't be done at the normal domestic dwelling because you need about 80amps. Sorry about this as I have never seen one, when on the fast charge you have a heavy lead and socket plugged into the car, so it is not the same receptable input as the slow charge. Not all that green, using, 3Kw for 12 hrs or 80amp for 1hr. There would not be enough power if half the country changed to electric cars. See that the electric buses seem to be a success and photo shows having to stop at a charging point. It must take some amps to charge the buses.
No doubt, Tokyo will come up with the new connector in 2013; the only connector that UK will come up with is from the pound shop.

Thanks. Know a bit more now,
Regards
jcm
 18 June 2012 05:07 PM
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HarryJMacdonald

Posts: 254
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An interesting aside is that when you fill a car with fuel at the pumps you are transferring energy at the rate of about 10MW. (5 mins to transfer enough energy to run a car for 8 hours). Filling stations are going to need 132kV supplies to each one if electric vehicles really take off.
 18 June 2012 11:08 PM
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AdrianWint

Posts: 262
Joined: 25 May 2006

I think this is going to become a big problem as the electric car takes off.

Petrol, despite all its other drawbacks, still contains an very large amount of energy in such a small volume and that energy can be transfered very quickly. Joe public hasnt yet realised that he can only transfer around 24kWh per recharge (3kw for 8 hrs) in a normal domestic setting. That isnt going to take him very far in his electric car (may 1 or 2 hrs or run?).

Also, if we are going to charge these cars overnight, consider the additional loading on the grid during the 'off peak' period..... today, during the summer months, the loading after midnight for the average street will be small... maybe 1 or 2A per house...... now bring in the electric car, pulling a sustained 13A per house for 8 hours...........


Adrian
 19 June 2012 08:18 AM
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sparkingchip

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There are number of videos on you tube similar to this "mobile charging truck"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ORM_x0dK5A

Andy
 19 June 2012 03:56 PM
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jcm256

Posts: 1861
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See the Nissan LEAF can power your home for two days when fully charged.

(looks like a good idea, for the UK get your 1 or 4hr fast charge for free, at council charging point, then power your house for two days, must be some snag)

The EV Power Station : Specifications
<When charging Nissan LEAFs>
Input voltage : Single-phase, AC 200V (±15%), 50 Hz / 60 Hz (±5%)
Input current range : AC 0 - 36A
Output voltage range : Maximum DC 450V
Peak power output : 6kW
Conversion efficiency : 90% or more (at rated output)
Power factor : 99% or more (at rated output)
<When supplying power to households>
Input voltage range : Maximum DC 450V
Input current range : DC 0 - 30A (Limited by cable specifications)
Output voltage : Single-phase three-wire system (AC 100V x two-phase)
AC100V (±6%), 50Hz / 60Hz
AC 200V (±6%), 50Hz / 60Hz (Max.±2%)
Output current range : AC 0 - 30A
Peak power output : 6kW (Single-phased, AC 100V.3kW x two-phase)
Conversion efficiency : 90% or more (at rated output)
External dimensions : 650 mm (W) x 350 mm (D) x 781 mm (H) (excluding projecting parts)
Mass : Approx. 60 kg




http://www.nichicon.co.jp/engl...oduct_news/new124.html
 19 June 2012 09:35 PM
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AdrianWint

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Quote "The lithium-ion batteries can store up to 24kWh of electricity, which is sufficient to supply an average Japanese household for about two days"

The average Japanese household uses 12kWh per day ..... I think somebody is pullin a few plonkers here! My house uses between around 20-24 kWh a day for a weekday & around 30-35 at the weekend...............

This is the problem with much of the 'facts' & figures about electric cars.... its all lies, damm lies & statistics!

Adrian
 19 June 2012 09:43 PM
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sparkingchip

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Input voltage : Single-phase, AC 200V (±15%)

That's me stuffed then.

Andy
 20 June 2012 12:19 PM
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AJJewsbury

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The average Japanese household uses 12kWh per day ..... I think somebody is pullin a few plonkers here! My house uses between around 20-24 kWh a day for a weekday & around 30-35 at the weekend

Mine's quite variable - but is often below 6kWh/day...

- Andy.
 20 June 2012 11:31 PM
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AdrianWint

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Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

The average Japanese household uses 12kWh per day ..... I think somebody is pullin a few plonkers here! My house uses between around 20-24 kWh a day for a weekday & around 30-35 at the weekend


Mine's quite variable - but is often below 6kWh/day...



- Andy.


Can we swap leccy bills .......pleeeeeease!
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