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Topic Title: Guarantee of Standards Scheme
Topic Summary: Do all schemes have one?
Created On: 30 March 2009 07:39 PM
Status: Post and Reply
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 08 April 2009 04:45 PM
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ACKS72

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Joined: 25 November 2008

Originally posted by: mark2spark

Yes Acks, I read that before, and take it on-board, but I think the distinction is, and can't remember where I read it now amongst all these links and rules/regs , is that DI's aren't covered for non DI work, so no guarantee there, and that if they ARE covered, for their DI work, then it's through the (compulsory) warranty.



Why would the DI be covered for non-domestic work it's out side his scope of works i.e. he's registered as a Domestic Installer (doesn't stop him from doing non-domestic work tho!!)

I think the basic gist of the thread is - It appears that the customer that employs an NICEIC electrician A.C or D.I is looked after by default by the NICEIC regardless of paperwork ( i stand to be corrected on this) but other schemes and i'll say NAPIT (only because other scheme members are mute (unless they are the only sparkies that are busy at the mo)) require paperwork to be in place and if it ain't then the customer is up that creek!!!
Unless i can be shown otherwise

Acks
 08 April 2009 05:15 PM
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mark2spark

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Well, as long as it's clear that a customer employing a Niceic DI to change a three phase board isn't covered by a guarantee of standards scheme. And wouldn't be covered under any Niceic warranty sold alongside the work.
But a customer employing a Napit or Elecsa member under the same scenario above would, it appears, be covered, by the warranty scheme, if the warranty scheme was taken up by the customer in the ElecSa situation.

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 08 April 2009 05:39 PM
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sparkingchip

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You have mentioned a intresting concept regards the NICEIC Domestic Installer scheme, private domestic houses with three phase supplies, a DI carrying out electrical installation work would be working single phase and there may be three seperate single phase consumer units, but the main board may be a three phase, so would this be out of scope for most DI's?

Andy
 08 April 2009 07:29 PM
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normcall

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I know a number of houses round my way that have a 3 phase supply, 3 phase DB for night storage heaters originally.
I've also found a number where the NSHs have been removed, sockets installed in their place and two or three phases available in one room!

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Norman
 08 April 2009 08:35 PM
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GeoffBlackwell

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Norman
The requirement to have all socket outlets on one phase in room (Reg A20) was dropped before the 15th Edition came out (1981) - you really must catch up with your reading .

Regards

Geoff Blackwell

Edited: 08 April 2009 at 08:36 PM by GeoffBlackwell
 08 April 2009 09:00 PM
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normcall

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So you think it's a good idea then, when it could be easily resolved?

This is like the job I went to see yesterday just to replace a light fitting. New fusebox fitted about 5 years ago - no earth! Customer admitted that when they replaced the water mains about 10 years ago they put a card through her letter box suggesting the earthing was tested.
'Been alright for the past 18 years' she says. I says, 'then you don't want the new light fitting installed then?'

I get stroppy at times!!

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Norman
 08 April 2009 09:04 PM
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GeoffBlackwell

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Mr Hoover (Father of Mr Dyson ) put pay to all worries about more than one phase in a room.

Regards

Geoff Blackwell
 08 April 2009 10:25 PM
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mark2spark

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Originally posted by: sparkingchip

You have mentioned a interesting concept regards the NICEIC Domestic Installer scheme, private domestic houses with three phase supplies, a DI carrying out electrical installation work would be working single phase and there may be three seperate single phase consumer units, but the main board may be a three phase, so would this be out of scope for most DI's?

Andy


Worth a new thread on it's own I reckon Andy.
I'm ElecSa A/C, so I would be alright, but ElecSa are very specific about their DI's (Defined scope), can't even do a new circuit, extending circuits only, about a kitchen fitters limit dare I say.
Although extending a circuit that isn't RCD might be one of these

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 08 April 2009 10:31 PM
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sparkingchip

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limiting people from installing a new circuit may result in a lowering of standards because a existing circuit may be extended, whereas a new circuit may be technically a better solution.

If a Electrical installer can safely extend a circuit then they are safe to install a new one, politicians should not be allowed to help devise rules like these.

Andy
 08 April 2009 10:32 PM
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sparkingchip

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I'm full scope before you ask.

Andy
 09 April 2009 06:58 AM
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normcall

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"If a Electrical installer can safely extend a circuit then they are safe to install a new one, politicians should not be allowed to help devise rules like these."

This is scheme operator rule to bring in more money, surely?

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Norman
 09 April 2009 09:12 PM
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dbullard

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Originally posted by: perspicacious

"an alert customer"



Bruce



A lot of posts on the forum (not just this topic) complain about the customers not knowing about Part P. Unless they do, the missing EIC and notification will mean nothing to them.



Regards



BOD




Unless picked by the building inspector on hand over of all relivent information surely Bod

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www.quest-electrical-sw.co.uk
 09 April 2009 09:46 PM
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perspicacious

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"Unless picked by the building inspector on hand over of all relivent information surely Bod"

Daren

I would imagine that the building inspector would only be involved on new build and as such, only see 1% ? of notifiable electrical work, the remaining 99% would be rewires, CU changes and other such work that should be notified.
The client would not therefore even have the building inspector around to get his guidance.

Regards

BOD
 09 April 2009 10:10 PM
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dbullard

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Bod,

As far as i am aware building inspectors get involved from drainage to rebuilds / conversions and can call to any building undergoing works.

A while ago i was conracted to a small building firm, all certification went to them and on to the customer for the final invoice etc etc.

It transpires that the building co owner has "done one" to the costas with a load of deposits etc, i only found out today when a customer asked where his certs were by email job finished last August!!! fortunately i was not owed any money by the company and thank god for NCR paper.

It was picked by the building inspector coming to sign the loft conversion off, where the certification was for the electrical installation.

Non notifiable work undertaken


Regards

Daren

-------------------------
..... Dont pee in my pocket and tell me its raining ......


www.quest-electrical-sw.co.uk
 11 April 2009 10:00 AM
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perspicacious

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I take your point Daren about the LABC involvement but I still maintain that 99% of work carried out would not involve the Building Inspector as it would be purely electrical.
Perhaps someone could look at their last month's notifications and post what % was purely "jobbing" for extra sockets, shower, garden power etc?
All that type of work relies on the integrity of the installer to notify

Regards

BOD
IET » Wiring and the regulations » Guarantee of Standards Scheme

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