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Topic Title: notifying
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Created On: 11 November 2008 05:05 PM
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 11 November 2008 05:05 PM
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gpaul2

Posts: 416
Joined: 16 February 2006

need some help clarifying where i stand . when it comes to new extension wiring or even whole house re-wiring and it has been notified to the local BC can i do the wiring even though i'm not part of a 'professional body'
i have c&g2330 level 3 2381&2382 &c&g 2391 , but the problem is i work for firms who are registered and never really needed to myself . but as of late i'm being asked to do domestic jobs privately ,i want to do them but cannot warrant the fee's against how little amount of domestic jobs that come my way ,what do i do???
 11 November 2008 05:35 PM
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John Peckham

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Simple you can do the work if the LABC is notified, and the fee paid, before you start. If the wiring is part of an extension, that should have been notified to the LABC anyway, the electrical installation should be inspected as part of the whole process. Talk to your LABC they may allow you to produce your qualifications and then allow you to do notifiable work without inspection if you have pre-notificed and paid maybe a lesser notification fee.

-------------------------
John Peckham

http://www.astutetechnicalservices.co.uk/
 11 November 2008 05:43 PM
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mikejumper

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Originally posted by: gpaul2

i want to do them but cannot warrant the fee's against how little amount of domestic jobs that come my way ,what do i do???


There's quite a few jobs that don't need notification, why not just do those and pass on the notifiable stuff.
 11 November 2008 06:01 PM
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spinlondon

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If the work has been notified, then anyone can do the work. They don't have to be qualified, and the work doesn't even have to comply with the Regs. It is up to the Building Inspector to check the installation and determine whether it is safe and he can sign it off. In most cases an IEC should be sufficient for the inspector to sign it off
 11 November 2008 07:25 PM
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gpaul2

Posts: 416
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THANKS FOR ALL YOUR REPLIES ITS A LOT CLEARER NOW
in summary then , if bc has been notified then joe blogs can do it and the bc tester will deem it safe/complies or not, and wether he accepts my test results/iec is up to him.
 12 November 2008 06:47 AM
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normcall

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Got it in one, the requirement is to notify.
Other than that, not a lot has changed.

-------------------------
Norman
 13 November 2008 01:11 PM
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mark2spark

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Originally posted by: spinlondon

If the work has been notified, then anyone can do the work. They don't have to be qualified, and the work doesn't even have to comply with the Regs. It is up to the Building Inspector to check the installation and determine whether it is safe and he can sign it off. In most cases an IEC should be sufficient for the inspector to sign it off


Well, i suppose not, assuming you mean that it complies with some other EU code of installation.
Not that I've heard of anyone using this avenue yet...

But to suggest (which you didn't exactly, i'm using 2+2=5 here) that it can be lashed in by anyone, without a thought to design, erection, etc etc and to just expect the BI to ok it is another matter.
A DIY'r following such course won't get it signed off, simple as.

For everyone's info, Woking council BC simply will not accept an eic from anyone not in a scam scheme, irrelevent of qualifications.
The larger problem is that they also charge an extra fee for sending out a PIR firm, something clearly not allowed, but no-one with the time and money has challenged them on it yet.

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I am prone to talking complete bol***ks at times, please accept my apologies in advance.
 13 November 2008 01:39 PM
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slainte

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Sandwell council will not accept an eic unless you are in a registered scheme.
 13 November 2008 02:02 PM
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normcall

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"charge an extra fee for sending out a PIR firm, something clearly not allowed, but no-one with the time and money has challenged them on it yet."

I would!!!
They don't have to accept anything as it's them who are inspecting - remember - Building Inspector!
I always send a copy certificate and I really don't care if they come or not.
While they get away with it - they will and they do talk to each other these LABCs.

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Norman
 13 November 2008 03:28 PM
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gpaul2

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been snooping around on this subject and found this,
how do you interpret this???
http://www.partp.co.uk/consumer/consumer_diy.asp
and this one , go down a few question for the re-wire one
http://www.partp.co.uk/consumer/consumer_diy.asp

Edited: 13 November 2008 at 03:32 PM by gpaul2
 13 November 2008 04:15 PM
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Testit

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Is there a new Doc P then? As some of the items listed for notification dont tally with the Doc P I read..

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Online Services - http://propertydevelopment.org.uk

Experience can sometimes show that cost prevails over quality and safety, such little self-value that people hold.
 13 November 2008 04:29 PM
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normcall

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This is almost as bad as the NICEIC one, bonding? - plug in shower pump?

Oh, well, not to worry.

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Norman
 13 November 2008 04:39 PM
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Testit

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Strange as NIC have bonding and other items for notification not required under Part P.. having said that it is nice to stick the six year insurance warranty on all work simply by notifying all work carried out... I dont see an issue with promoting notification of all work other than the possibility of being coerced to join a scheme giving them more leverage to raise the fees, or potentially drop them if more join maybe ??!!!??!?!?!?! as if... essentially if all work was notifiable regardless then cowboys couldnt offer notification and insurance on work carried out for less than 5 quid... or may do as they will be printing their own eh..

Edit: typo

-------------------------
Online Services - http://propertydevelopment.org.uk

Experience can sometimes show that cost prevails over quality and safety, such little self-value that people hold.

Edited: 13 November 2008 at 08:23 PM by Testit
 13 November 2008 08:23 PM
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Testit

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having stated that, its notifiable on BRCS but the pocket guides say bonding is not notifiable with guidance stating if in doubt then notify anyway to be sure.. personally I think its a good call to notify anyway and use the insurance as a selling point..

-------------------------
Online Services - http://propertydevelopment.org.uk

Experience can sometimes show that cost prevails over quality and safety, such little self-value that people hold.
 14 November 2008 07:59 AM
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gpaul2

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bit of a minefield this subject, even the authorities can't seem to give a definitive answer
http://www.labc.uk.com/site/sc...goryID=93&faqID=52#a52
 14 November 2008 08:25 PM
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spm

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the labc are not signing of your work, the cert (building compliance form) they issue is simply saying they have been notified work has taken place and have recieved a eic from someone who claimed they have done a proper job , a mate of mine has recently pir d a job which was lethal the owner said but i only had that work done a year ago , really who by? this bloke here (shows card) the bloke from building control came round, well this fella is now trying to take labc to court who are saying they are not responsible , a conclusion has not yet been reached
 14 November 2008 08:48 PM
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ajelectrical

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Originally posted by: spinlondon

If the work has been notified, then anyone can do the work.
Wrong. Anyone 'competent' can do the work

They don't have to be qualified, and the work doesn't even have to comply with the Regs.
Really??
Which regs??
IEE Wiring regs?
Building regulations Approved document A or B or E or F or L1 or M or P ALL of which relate to electrical work


It is up to the Building Inspector to check the installation and determine whether it is safe and he can sign it off
Really ??? I have never met a Building Control Officer armed with a full testing kit and the knowlage to use it

In most cases an IEC should be sufficient for the inspector to sign it off

Really?? what is an IEC?

Not a very accurate post by you there spinlondon. You aren't a 5 day wonder are you?? Sorry if I appear to be having a rant

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Andrew. But I don't want you to test anything. I just want the board changing !!
 15 November 2008 09:11 AM
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normcall

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So, summarising:
LABC inspect and say it complies with the Building Regulations (or not).
Part P of the Building Regulations require specified electrical work to be carried out safely.

Have I missed something?

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Norman
 15 November 2008 09:24 AM
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CH1LLY

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Just notified a small extension with local council-the process was very easy (a bit too easy).Is there any cost? NO its already been paid for in the initial application.Do i need to call you in pre plasterboard? NO you are certifying the work to say its above board.Any paperwork that you require? YES just send a completed EIC when the job is completed and copies of your' 2381<<< and 2391. Nice people we have in Staffordshire.
 15 November 2008 10:59 AM
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Phillron

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Originally posted by: CH1LLY

Just notified a small extension with local council-the process was very easy (a bit too easy).Is there any cost? NO its already been paid for in the initial application.Do i need to call you in pre plasterboard? NO you are certifying the work to say its above board.Any paperwork that you require? YES just send a completed EIC when the job is completed and copies of your' 2381<<< and 2391. Nice people we have in Staffordshire.


Why cant all things be so simple ?
Off with your head part p

Edited: 15 November 2008 at 11:01 AM by Phillron
IET » Wiring and the regulations » notifying

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