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Topic Title: Shed supply
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Created On: 08 November 2017 07:04 AM
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 08 November 2017 07:04 AM
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NR316

Posts: 67
Joined: 25 September 2016

Hello

I was wondering when is it appropriate to install a 2 way fuse board in a shed instead of a 20A radial (with a fused spur for lights) from the house consumer unit.

Thanks in advance

nr316
 08 November 2017 07:54 AM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 1445
Joined: 19 January 2016

Depends which side of the bed I got out of

In seriousness, only if a greater demand is required in the shed.
 08 November 2017 08:38 AM
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Jaymack

Posts: 5370
Joined: 07 April 2004

Originally posted by: NR316
I was wondering when is it appropriate to install a 2 way fuse board in a shed instead of a 20A radial (with a fused spur for lights) from the house consumer unit.

Depends if you may require outside sockets etc., in the future. Do you require an earth rod?

Regards
 08 November 2017 08:48 AM
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Zoomup

Posts: 3365
Joined: 20 February 2014

There is nothing wrong with installing a two way consumer unit in a shed, sometimes referred to as a "garage unit". R.C.D. protection is also a wise thing. The garage unit normally contains a 30mA R.C.D. as a double pole main switch. So if you use the shed's sockets for outdoor equipment then greater protection is afforded by using a garage unit with R.C.D. But if cash is tight then the original plan can also be used. A 30mA R.C.D. at the circuit's origin in the house can be utilized to offer protection to the shed sockets.

Z.
 08 November 2017 09:29 AM
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mapj1

Posts: 9553
Joined: 22 July 2004

It does indeed depend on the shed, its intended use, and the likely budget.

A fused spur out the back of a kitchen socket by the back door may well do just fine for a lean to dog kennel sized effort storing 3 children's bikes and a second hand lawnmower that is the largest load ever to be used. In some more downmarket examples of such a cases I'd rather have a plan for easy isolation and decommissioning in case it blows away in a high wind, where it becomes an outdoor socket on the wall.
A small office or workshop requires a more thought out approach as there may be heaters, IT equipment giving near constant loading, machine tools, emergency lights ..... Then a 'full monty ' small CU on a distribution circuit is in order.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 08 November 2017 09:46 AM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 1445
Joined: 19 January 2016

Are we talking small garden tool shed or 200sq foot garden work shop

The later might warrant more then a skinny 2.5mm cable spur of the house Rfc

I have a 2 way screwfix garage jobbie in my shed but only because I had taken it out of another job so put it back to good use.
Otherwise I would have fitted a dual patters north south just inside the shed door and put a socket at the bottom and the swi spur at the top to act as my light switch
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