IET logo
 
IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Leighton Buzzard Battery Storage System.
Topic Summary: The Way Forward.
Created On: 12 July 2017 11:21 AM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 12 July 2017 11:21 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Zoomup

Posts: 3205
Joined: 20 February 2014

To allow electricity storage during the day from solar production or wind when available a battery storage system is used to allow night time use. I used to live near to Leighton Buzzard, and am interested in this report of a battery storage system. http://www.younicos.com/case-studies/leighton-buzzard/

Z.
 13 July 2017 10:56 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



jammyc

Posts: 23
Joined: 25 November 2009

As well as peak shaving, battery storage can also help with system intertia (relevant now more generation is coming through inverters) and with managing network voltage, both allowing greater penetration by RE. So agreed, defo the way forward!

More info on the Leighton Buzzard project (and some other case studies and a whole load of interesting, if a little dated for a fast moving industry, reading) here
https://www.eatechnology.com/projects/electrical-energy-storage/

James
 13 July 2017 12:59 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



ectophile

Posts: 742
Joined: 17 September 2001

Does this big battery make sense financially?

A while back, I was offered a (much smaller) battery bank to go with my solar panels. It would have allowed me to store all the daytime power I don't use, and use it in the evening. I was tempted, until someone on another forum suggested I do the maths.

I added up the total amount of electricity the battery could store over its expected 10 year lifetime, and multiplied that by the retail cost per unit for electricity. That came to substantially less than the cost of buying the battery.

-------------------------
S P Barker BSc PhD IEng MIET
 13 July 2017 03:04 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



jammyc

Posts: 23
Joined: 25 November 2009

Short answer is yes for bigger plants and aggregated fleets, but that's because you can provide grid services as well as simple energy arbitrage (i.e. the grid services mentioned above plus some others), and also there's HH rates with DUoS RAG etc. There are a number of substantial commercially funded utility plants under construction that'll go live in the next 6-12 months; they not pilots and funders wouldn't touch them if it didn't stack up.

I've not done financials on one-off smaller projects for a while, but Li-ion unit prices have been plummetting (thanks in large part to the automotive industry) so might be worth a revisit. The designer would need to be clever about sizing and understanding the load profile though (which is admittedly more difficult for domestics as the step size in kit is larger and there's less info or control to work with), and I expect it will still be tight if you're just looking at peak shaving FIT versus domestic flat-rate import, depending on what you have and haven't included for in the calcs.
 13 July 2017 03:27 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



broadgage

Posts: 2350
Joined: 07 August 2007

Originally posted by: ectophile

Does this big battery make sense financially?
A while back, I was offered a (much smaller) battery bank to go with my solar panels. It would have allowed me to store all the daytime power I don't use, and use it in the evening. I was tempted, until someone on another forum suggested I do the maths.
I added up the total amount of electricity the battery could store over its expected 10 year lifetime, and multiplied that by the retail cost per unit for electricity. That came to substantially less than the cost of buying the battery.


A privately owned battery used to store renewably generated power for later use, or to store energy purchased in the off peak, for use in the peak, is most unlikely to be economic.
As you point out, the cycle life of the battery and therefore the cost of each KWH cycled through the battery is likely to exceed the cost of purchase from the grid as needed.
No point in storing energy in a battery at a cost of 50 pence a KWH when you can buy it for 20 pence a KWH.

This case is however rather different. It is for the use of the electrical supply industry which drastically alters the economics.
Spending say £20 million on a battery to meet a peak load might save £50 million that would otherwise be spent on building a new transmission line.
And even given adequate transmission capacity, providing enough generating capacity for brief peaks is very expensive in both capital outlay, and in fuel used by running plant inefficiently at part load so as to be available for unexpected demands.
It is said that the true value of a single KWH in the high peak can be as much as £1, or in exceptional conditions several £ for a single KWH.
Electricity that costs say 50 pence a KWH from a battery is most attractive under such circumstances.
 15 July 2017 06:20 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



justinneedham

Posts: 86
Joined: 21 January 2005

Nissan/Eaton are set up to compete with Tesla for home storage, making use of old EV batteries (which have years worth of capacity left, but not at the peak energy density required for EV). Nissan/Eatonhttps://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/may/04/nissan-launches-british-made-home-battery-to-rival-teslas-powerwall
 16 July 2017 11:52 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Zoomup

Posts: 3205
Joined: 20 February 2014

Originally posted by: justinneedham

Nissan/Eaton are set up to compete with Tesla for home storage, making use of old EV batteries (which have years worth of capacity left, but not at the peak energy density required for EV). Nissan/Eatonhttps://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/may/04/nissan-launches-british-made-home-battery-to-rival-teslas-powerwall


Hello Justin,
the Powerwall thingy will cost £5,000 minimum just for the batteries. It will though have a 5 year warranty. It has batteries made in Sunderland but it will be assembled in Morocco; some international heavy freight shipping there then. Ecological?

I am not so sure that the now educated great unwashed will like the idea of lithium ion batteries in their homes due to previous incidents of fire with these types of batteries.

I can't really see this product taking off. A bit like the Sinclair C5 electric car thingy.

I'm out.

Bye,

Z.
 16 July 2017 10:00 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



ectophile

Posts: 742
Joined: 17 September 2001

I can see home storage taking off as soon as the battery cost is low enough that it's economically viable.

That said, if the electricity suppliers ever start installing proper export metering for solar installations, the economics will suddenly change. At the moment, the whole system is completely skewed by the assumption that everybody exports 50% of what they generate, and uses the other 50%. This means that any electricity used in the home when it's sunny costs absolutely nothing - you still get paid for exporting half of it, even if you didn't.

-------------------------
S P Barker BSc PhD IEng MIET
 17 July 2017 11:36 AM
User is online View Users Profile Print this message



AJJewsbury

Posts: 15708
Joined: 13 August 2003

At the moment, the whole system is completely skewed by the assumption that everybody exports 50% of what they generate, and uses the other 50%. This means that any electricity used in the home when it's sunny costs absolutely nothing - you still get paid for exporting half of it, even if you didn't.

It's not the assumption, but the tariff, that's skewed - you get paid a substantial amount for generating a unit - whether it's consumed or exported - the extra for exporting is only about 3p/unit - hence it not being economic to meter (they just add 1.5p to the generation rate).
- Andy.
 17 July 2017 11:51 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



broadgage

Posts: 2350
Joined: 07 August 2007

I would not be too keen on a large lithium battery indoors. Accidents have occurred and may become more frequent as production of the cells and assembly into batteries becomes "value engineered"

The risk is not that great, but petrol in tightly sealed metal cans is fairly safe, though only a fool would store petrol in their house.
Statistics

New here?


See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2017 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.

..