IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Infection Control
Topic Summary: Cleaning a building durring construction?
Created On: 02 February 2014 06:15 PM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 02 February 2014 06:15 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



TerryH66

Posts: 2
Joined: 25 July 2008

All, this may seam a strange topic? I am presently Mgr Engineering & Commissioning in Libya (Hospital Build). The main contractor although very willing is basically clueless?
I need an Infection control Policy for -
A - cleaning the building (which is only 68% complete) every man & his dog are in and out and it is a building site.
B - If and when there is a "Builders Clean" completed, how to keep it clean with so much work still needing to be done.
C - How do I ensure pipework, duct work (inside and out) are carried out to the HTM's
I understand a chemist needs to be involved but it is to early?
Terry H
 04 February 2014 11:48 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



jarathoon

Posts: 1041
Joined: 05 September 2004

There is a specialist institution for hospital engineers in the UK "Institute of Healthcare Engineering and Estate Management"

http://www.iheem.org.uk/





-------------------------
James Arathoon
 04 February 2014 12:17 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19663
Joined: 23 March 2004

OK - it's probably far too late to be considering infection control issues at this stage (or at least the infection control strategy certainly hasn't found its way into the construction teams hands by the sound of it)

Perhaps a look at Health Building Note 00-09: Infection control in the built environment, would be a good starting point to see where you should have been. UK focused but still relevant

Don't take this the wrong way, but I suspect you will have different priorities during the construction phase, so you realy should have access to someone with a proven background in infection control management - either on the client side or the contractor side - but there needs to be someone in place - particularly as you are now reaching a critical point where areas start to get closed up, ductwork gets completed, ditto for pipework etc.

I once had a horrific problem where some clown had left his packed lunch in vent dictwork supplying a theatre - it took literally weeks to get to the bottom of the problem and more weeks to actually get decontamination in place before we could even think about commissioning.

In the UK, it would be much easier, as the NHS has plenty of well qualified and experienced infection control staff to engage with

In Libya, I'm unsure of what organisation the client has for back up, but certainly on overseas healthcare jobs I've worked on, throughout the middle East we've made sure the client appoints an infection control specialist to provide guidance during the design process and to manage the IC aspects of the construction phases.

From there, obviously, you'll have the very specific IC issues relating to theatres etc.

As a guiding principle at construction, as you complete areas prior to commissioning, get them deep cleaned and then locked up - constructors are not renowned for thier attention to site hygeine so keep them out as much as possible.

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 10 February 2014 07:48 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



TerryH66

Posts: 2
Joined: 25 July 2008

Thanks for the notes.
Failure is NOT an option.
Thanks again.
Terryh
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.