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Topic Title: Building Regs
Topic Summary: Retrospectively applicable?
Created On: 18 December 2013 09:35 AM
Status: Read Only
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 18 December 2013 09:35 AM
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SherlockOhms

Posts: 322
Joined: 05 April 2011

To cut a long story short, a solicitor recently informed me that building regs are retrospectively applicable.

Example. A conservatory (including heat/power) -built ten years ago has no building control cert.
If LBC come out to check it they will apply current regs and probaly require remedial work.

This all seems a bit much? surely the regs in force at the time of build would be applicable?

Discuss.

S.
 18 December 2013 05:17 PM
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christait

Posts: 24
Joined: 08 February 2013

Not a lawyer, but my understanding is that if the correct procedures had been followed at the time the rules at the time would have and would still apply, however if no formal legal record of the installation lies with building control from the installation date then to all intents and purposes it was installed today and needs to meet current legislation. Otherwise some unscrupulous types would still be installing to the 14th edition or earlier and claiming grandfather rights on the work.
 22 December 2013 10:27 AM
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fakhr

Posts: 1
Joined: 22 December 2013

I want to aware the people to know about the asbestos related diseases and I want to I want to take this topic in engineering IET
Asbestos Identifying

Edited: 23 December 2013 at 09:56 AM by fakhr
 29 December 2013 09:33 AM
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normcall

Posts: 8134
Joined: 15 January 2005

"Otherwise some unscrupulous types would still be installing to the 14th edition or earlier and claiming grandfather rights on the work."
Are you suggesting that the 'wiring regulations' are unsafe once a new edition is issued?

Returning to OP, take no notice as we had a surveyor inspect our place for a prospective purchaser. Apparently wall switches are illegal in toilets. Once I asked him which law it broke, he quoted 'Part P', so naturally I asked which section of 'Part P', quick as a flash he came back with 'BS7671'. Asking which particular section stopped him finally!

Professionals think they know it all - bit like asking a solicitor to explain the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 and why they tend to ignore the Law Society Guldelines on how to treat this totally strange piece of legislation.

-------------------------
Norman
 09 January 2014 03:08 PM
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christait

Posts: 24
Joined: 08 February 2013

I am not suggesting that previous regulations were unsafe at the time they were in force, however due to advances in technology and engineering/scientific knowledge and understanding, current regulations are (probably) safer in the current world. This said some practices acceptable in early editions of the regulations could well be unsafe using current methods and materials and given the increased expectations of the general public for electrical installations/equipment to be safe. If regulation was perfect and full knowledge af all dangers and hazards was available from the start of all sciences/technologies there would be no need for any updates to regulations, fortunately knowledge and understanding of the science and technology related to the use of electricity is continuously being advanced and practices made safer. This increase in safety is the aim of updating regulations, and the phrase in legislation which requires this is the wonderful line 'in so far as is reasonably practicable.' RCD protection is a good example of this, as this was unknown technology when electrical regs were first written, were largely cost prohibitive and unreliable in their early days of development, yet are now reliable and cost effective and hence often required by regulation (they have become reasonably practicable).
 22 January 2014 08:33 PM
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cookers

Posts: 205
Joined: 10 February 2012

Had a similar one, my garage erected with planning consent in 1962 had power supplied to it from the day it was built, never had any safety issue with it SWA/metalclad sockets etc etc.

I was asked to supply PART P compliance certificate for the garage, told them to go away!
IET » Built environment » Building Regs

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