IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Green Roofs
Topic Summary: Can someone shed some light on green roofs
Created On: 05 March 2012 03:54 PM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 05 March 2012 03:54 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



roger303

Posts: 1
Joined: 05 March 2012

I am researching for uni, got an enviroment project mainly to do with highways and transport.
Been writing about the Urban Heat Island effect due to the vast amounts of landscape overtaken with tac mac especially in the UK, from my understanding (which is minimal on this subject at the moment) we could reduce the Urban Heat Island effect by colouring tarmac producing a lighter colour. Also Green roofs could help but how do structures react to having green roofs ( i know that roofs are designed to carry vast snow loads which may never occur in the buildings life) but can green roofs be added to existing structures? or is it just viable to be incorperated into new builds? If anyone has a knowledge of environmental engineering or a structural engineering knowledge, I would be greatful any input or suggestions
Thanks
Tony
Link removed/
 05 March 2012 04:16 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19900
Joined: 23 March 2004

You could start here

There is a lot that could be done, that isn't for many reasons.

Green roofs are useful, but really are just another patch stuck on the underlying problems - probably more useful for drainage rather than heat island problems.

Be careful of so called "reflective" tarmacs - you can end up re directing heat to where you really don't want it.

One thing you may want to look at is how to capture the heat that falls on tarmac and use it for winter use - as a kick off take a look at this - look at interseasonal heat storage and let your imagination go from there.

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 08 March 2012 08:52 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



keamy

Posts: 1
Joined: 08 March 2012

Having learn somthing...
 19 March 2012 04:52 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



normcall

Posts: 8177
Joined: 15 January 2005

One of the new school building had a 'green roof' near to where I am. Lots of claims were made when it was installed, but a few years down the line and it has gone from needing a good mowing to the current brown field look.

-------------------------
Norman
 17 May 2012 12:26 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



buildingangel

Posts: 18
Joined: 12 January 2012

I guess Green Roofs can also help in reducing or maintaining heat thats why they are used in tree houses, and plant nurseries...

Roofing Services
 19 May 2012 10:54 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



BobTylor

Posts: 12
Joined: 19 May 2012

One of the new institution developing had a 'green roof' near to where I am. Plenty of statements were created when it was set up, but a few decades down the range and it has gone from requiring an excellent cutting to the present Turkish area look.

-------------------------
Allied Roofing Services
info@alliedroofingservices.com
Crestwood, IL, 60445 USA
(708) 415-4474
 07 June 2012 02:40 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for Antonyw.
Antonyw

Posts: 7
Joined: 14 September 2010

Hi Roger,

Green Roofs or Sedum Roofs because of the Sedum Plant used are ideal with improving the surface water run off from roofs and are used in helping to obtain the 20% renewables from new builds or large refurbishment construction projects. (government directive) They can also assist with heat containment as well.
As long as they are maintained on an annual basis, their growth rates are very slow; cleared of debris, dead leaves etc they look fine.
What ever you do don't ever incorporate a green roof if there is a problem with Japonese Knotweed in the close proximity of the site or location.
I was recently managing a school construction project where a green roof was specified. Later we discovered there was substantial knotweed growth on a nearby river bank.
So the green roof was omitted and we then changed the spec of the roof i.e. enlarged the ZED sections for the flat roof construction to enable an array of photo voltaics to be fitted to achieve the 20% renewables.
I hope this helps.
Keep up the banter!
 24 June 2012 08:11 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



stableford

Posts: 64
Joined: 04 April 2006

One of the problems with this type of roof is the extra structural requirements, and a nightmare with penetrations, according to the structural engineers at the place where I work, in Canada.
 28 June 2012 07:08 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19900
Joined: 23 March 2004

Although, arguably, the extra structure translates to extra mass which is all good in damping diurnal swings of the building indoor temperature.

I would have thought penetrations would be no more "difficult" than normal - at lesst they haven't been on any projects I've worked on that had green roofs.

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 31 July 2012 05:59 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for emscarlos.
emscarlos

Posts: 1
Joined: 31 July 2012

Hi Mr OMS , I don't enough idea about it until posted here.

Thanks
 03 August 2012 11:11 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



sophiaedward123

Posts: 1
Joined: 12 July 2012

Green rooftops are often determined as one of two major types: comprehensive, or superficial green rooftops, and comprehensive, or deep green rooftops. These kinds have different features and performances and are suitable for different design objectives, architectural requirements and ceiling conditions.
 10 September 2012 11:13 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for cmatheson.
cmatheson

Posts: 211
Joined: 16 January 2003

Why pay for slates or tiles when you can dig it out of your garden. You need to get the liner right and protect it while you lay the turf. Also, barge boards tend not to last so do without if you can. Wild flowers are easy but if its not tended, it will end up looking like any other garden.

Quite common where I live and I'm currently planning to retrofit a felt foof.

-------------------------
Chris Matheson MInstMC
 17 September 2012 01:44 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



electricaltestinguk1

Posts: 11
Joined: 12 July 2012

learning a lot from this site....
 11 November 2012 05:23 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



theprotagonist

Posts: 2
Joined: 11 November 2012

Nowadays, therea re really a lot of people who wants to live the dream of green living. In my opinion, I prefer it since it helps a lot in our environment and also helps to conserve energy and many other advantages like, green roofs last longer than conventional roofs
 28 March 2013 03:06 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



laptopfullcare

Posts: 3
Joined: 28 March 2013

Green roofs are useful, but really are just another stuck patch on the underlying problems - probably more useful for drainage rather than heat island problems.

Edited: 28 March 2013 at 03:16 AM by laptopfullcare
IET » Built environment » Green Roofs

Topic Tools Topic Tools
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.