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Topic Title: Marine & aircraft electrician wanting to do the C&G 2330
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Created On: 30 January 2010 08:12 PM
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 30 January 2010 08:12 PM
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antant

Posts: 8
Joined: 05 January 2010

Hello All,

This is my first post on the forum.

I am after advice on how I should proceed with my education. I am thinking about studying for the City & Guilds 2330 Level 3. I already have a lot of electrical experience but none of it is household.
My employment history is - Royal Navy aircraft electrician 5 years &
Merchant Navy ships engineer 15 years.

From the Navy I received a C&G in The part one certificate in engineering craft studies, 2 components - general, electrical engineering. Anyone know what this compares to in the modern system? I took it in 1986. Does it have any value?

My Merchant Navy Licence states under Functions and levels of responsibility - Functions, Electrical, Electronic and control engineering. Level of responsibility, management level.

I am still working at sea so I will need to do all the studying by myself. Is this possible? Can I just sit the exam? Are there correspondence courses?
Any ideas on how I would gain the NVQ? Can this be done without an examiner visiting my place of work? Can I get the NVQ if my electrical work is ship based?

Lots of questions, sorry.
I look forward to any help.
 31 January 2010 11:58 AM
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nickhugill

Posts: 1
Joined: 09 January 2010

Hello antant,

I completed the level3 2330 last year, though my situation is slightly different to yours.
I work offshore on a 2 on 2 off rotation and had originally planned to study the day release course at the local college and catch up with what I missed under my own steam. When I asked the college about this, they suggested I enroll in the full time course and attend when I can. The full time course being only 2 1/2 days a week. I ended up only attending 2 1/2 days every four weeks. I passed it with good grades and my electrical experience isn't as extensive as your own. The course elements area usually made up into modules so I can't see it being a problem sending them to you when your away. Exams can be sat any time, I think they have to register you with C&G about 7 days before for each exam.
I would suggest you actually go and speak to your local college, the tutors will bend over backwards to accomodate you as the colleges are always needing to keep their numbers up.
 01 February 2010 01:38 PM
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nsambrook

Posts: 265
Joined: 13 October 2006

Your previous qualification may be of some assistance but I would suggest that things have moved on considerably since 1986, not least the 16th Edition and then the 17th Edition as well as a lot of movement in technology. Electrical principles would not really have changed though.

There are distance courses available, Bridgwater College for instance run one that has a reasonable reputation. Some colleges will just let you take the exams but you have to think that there are 4 assignments that have to be completed across the 2 levels and also 2 written exams that need to be taken into account in your first year. The 206 assignment assumes a reasonable level of installation competence, I would think you would be up to it but I am not too sure as to the difference in standards and techniques between the forces and the civilian world.

The main thing you also want to think about is the fact that the 2330 will no longer be Government funded after August 2010, it's replacement the C&G2357 will be the one that attracts the relevant funding. When I say government funding, they put 50% of the cost towards your education (which is about £2000 a year on average all in for the 2330, so your expected contribution is usually about £1000) so if you choose to start the 2330 now, you will have to pay more money at some point in the future and *may* come into difficulties later if you wanted to do the NVQ Level 3 (C&G2356) as that will also not be funded after Aug 2010 (and runs out with the 2330 in 2013 off the top of my head).

It is unlikely you will get an assessor to visit you if you are not local, every college and provider run on very, very tight budgets indeed (and rapidly decreasing too, watch for all the college redundancies next academic year) so any visit that isn't within a certain mileage is likely to be a no-no. Usually as a rule of thumb it's about a 50 mile radius.

I hope this answers some of your questions.

-------------------------
http://www.electricalqualifications.co.uk
http://www.electricalexams.co.uk
http://www.electricalrevision.co.uk
 04 February 2010 07:01 PM
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antant

Posts: 8
Joined: 05 January 2010

Thanks very much for the replies and the link to Bridgwater College.

When you say assignments, does this mean practical work that has to be done at the college? Is it possible to do the 2330 without going to college at all? ie. can it be done by just sitting the written exams?

I am not trying to get out of it. It is just that I am abroad most of the time and it would be very difficult and wasteful, just to return for a few days of practical work.

I understand the difficulty in doing the NVQ. Maybe I could arrange to do some 'free' work with a contractor just for the work assesment.

Thanks again.
 04 February 2010 10:43 PM
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nsambrook

Posts: 265
Joined: 13 October 2006

It's not possible to totally complete the 2330 online, every distance provider has some sort of "block release" program that incorporates the assignment. For instance, the 204 assignment should have the assessor observe you do the safe isolation procedure then watch you measure voltage and current. The 206 is a practical task that involves SWA and 2 wiring systems wiring a lighting and power circuit. These are time limited and you should be assessed doing them. The 302 and 303 are full inspection and test and fault finding tasks. I would think it would be unlikely that someone would offer completion without some sort of attendance (and keep C&G recognition status).

A lot of adults gain work experience through contacts to complete their NVQ, it does seem a good option if they cover a range of different work. I have known a lot of experienced adults complete the full NVQ Level 3 in less than 6 months with the right attitude and a few within 3 months with the right attitude, broad experience and a wide range of work options.

-------------------------
http://www.electricalqualifications.co.uk
http://www.electricalexams.co.uk
http://www.electricalrevision.co.uk
 08 February 2010 06:40 AM
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j0hng00ds0n

Posts: 23
Joined: 09 May 2007

When you say assignments, does this mean practical work that has to be done at the college? Is it possible to do the 2330 without going to college at all? ie. can it be done by just sitting the written exams?


Hi Antant, I'm doing the 2330 with Bridgwater and am on the newly written level 3. They're very helpful there. If you're a self-starter, are motivated and want to get on, you should have no problem. My experience with the level 2, I used just the coursework with no previous exposure to the 204 practical, but I'd had previous experience of house-bashing to stand me in good stead. The 2 other guys doing it at the same time were local and they had attended a 10-evening course which took them through just the practical. Living so far away, there was no way I could have popped in for an evening, so it's fine not having been there before you turn up for the exam. I prepared as much as I could by reading what the expectaions were from the C&G info and also asked the college. As long as you keep in touch with them and ask any questions, it seems to work well.
 15 February 2010 12:00 PM
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antant

Posts: 8
Joined: 05 January 2010

Thanks again for the replies.
Maybe I should look more in the direction of theory based qualifications. Not sure which ones.
I am aware that the 2330 NVQ is very much aimed at the working 'household' electrician. Experience in which I lack. This leaves me in a grey area I suppose. To be an electrician requires 'household' experience, my experience is in other electrical fields which don't seem to be covered. Except the aircraft side, which is not the field I would want to get back into.
At the end of the day I would like to just call myself an electrician. Is the 2330 the only option?
 15 February 2010 10:26 PM
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nsambrook

Posts: 265
Joined: 13 October 2006

Originally posted by: antant

Thanks again for the replies.

Maybe I should look more in the direction of theory based qualifications. Not sure which ones.

I am aware that the 2330 NVQ is very much aimed at the working 'household' electrician. Experience in which I lack. This leaves me in a grey area I suppose. To be an electrician requires 'household' experience, my experience is in other electrical fields which don't seem to be covered. Except the aircraft side, which is not the field I would want to get back into.

At the end of the day I would like to just call myself an electrician. Is the 2330 the only option?


The 2330 and the NVQ are entirely separate qualifications. Neither require any domestic work. The 2330 is done at college/trainers and the NVQ (2356) is done while working on site usually in the form of log books and site visits. The NVQ can be completed without ever stepping foot in a house, it merely requires covering 2 from 3 from domestic, commercial and industrial.

I would recommend waiting to see what the industry decide they are going to change the qualification into in September before making a decision. Note I say "industry" for the record as many seem to think that the colleges make up the qualifications rather than truth which is the ECA in conjunction with a government body.

-------------------------
http://www.electricalqualifications.co.uk
http://www.electricalexams.co.uk
http://www.electricalrevision.co.uk
 30 March 2010 09:55 AM
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antant

Posts: 8
Joined: 05 January 2010

Nsambrook,

Sorry about the delay, I did not seem to get a notification of your post. Probably missed it.

I have bought some study books and will get on top of these before I decide which route to take.

Thanks for the help.
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