IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: I want to be an Electrician?!
Topic Summary:
Created On: 29 April 2009 12:23 AM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 29 April 2009 12:23 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



gavinbowyer

Posts: 3
Joined: 28 April 2009

I'm 32, and would like to become a qualified Electrician. I have no previous experience. What is the best way for me to achieve this?

Have been considering doing a homestudy course to get 2382 and 2391. Perhaps with Link removed or Link removed .

Does anyone have any advice for me please?
 29 April 2009 12:43 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Matttern

Posts: 18
Joined: 14 March 2009

2382 and 2391 in there own rights will not make you an approved electrician.
I would look at completing a c&g 2330 Electro Technical, or a c&g 2356 in electrical installation.
If you can gain employment in the trade, then the 2356 would be my favourite. If you are starting from scratch then it may be worth your while to contact a local college and see what courses they offer. If you have prior experiance in electrical installation it will make your task a lot easier

Regards

Matt Turner TMIET

Edited: 29 April 2009 at 12:45 AM by Matttern
 29 April 2009 04:06 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



jockspark

Posts: 195
Joined: 23 February 2008

hi as mattern said contact your local college
be aware of
pay me ££££££££££££££££ and i will make you
an electrician
 29 April 2009 07:40 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



gavinbowyer

Posts: 3
Joined: 28 April 2009

Hi Jock,
Thanks for taking time to reply. I quite liked the idea of paying to become an Electrician. Carrying on in my current job and paying £6000 to get qualified would be cheaper than going down to £10000 salary as an apprentice for me.
Why are homestudy courses not a good idea? Is it because it's impossible to learn without experience ? Is there another route other than appenticeship ?
 29 April 2009 08:24 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



gavinbowyer

Posts: 3
Joined: 28 April 2009

Hi Matt,
Thanks for taking time to reply. Very helpful. I'll get onto the college tomorrow ! Am I right in saying I really need to do an appenticeship?
Anyone out there want to take on an apprentice ? (Suffolk, Essex, Cambridgeshire). Desperate to learn !!
 08 May 2009 06:54 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



nsambrook

Posts: 265
Joined: 13 October 2006

Originally posted by: gavinbowyer
Am I right in saying I really need to do an appenticeship?


Not necessarily but it is advantageous as you will get the equivalent of the old "indentured" type electrical apprenticeship. You can study all the bits individually, such as the 2330 and the NVQ Level 3 (and the AM2) to get JIB registration, which is what you should really be aiming for.

-------------------------
http://www.electricalqualifications.co.uk
http://www.electricalexams.co.uk
http://www.electricalrevision.co.uk
 10 May 2009 07:33 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



NeilDay

Posts: 3
Joined: 10 May 2009

Hi Guys, I'm in a similar situation - 29 fed up with my current career and thinking about becoming an electrician. I have reecntly been left some money and was thinking of taking a year off to retrain. Does this sound sensible? What can I expect to earn? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated.
 10 May 2009 08:16 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



mtiplady

Posts: 52
Joined: 28 March 2008

IMO, a year won't be enough time to train, but the best course of action would be to speak to your local college and see what the options are. Don't settle for one of the "I can make you an electrician in five days" courses though. Ideally, you should be follow what nsambrook said: C&G 2330, NVQ Level 3 and then the AM2. That way, you can get professionally recognised as an electrician by the JIB.
 10 May 2009 08:26 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

Originally posted by: NeilDay

Hi Guys, I'm in a similar situation - 29 fed up with my current career and thinking about becoming an electrician. I have reecntly been left some money and was thinking of taking a year off to retrain. Does this sound sensible? What can I expect to earn? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated.


If you do not have relevant electrical experience then you will find it extremely difficult to get work. If by chance you did find some work the salary on offer will be relatively low whilst you are gaining experience. You do not say too much about your current work, experience or qualifications which makes it rather difficult for people to offer you 'other' advice.

Regards.
 10 May 2009 11:47 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



NeilDay

Posts: 3
Joined: 10 May 2009

Thanks mtiplady. I have had a look at courses run by local colleges and they seem interesting - I have an appointment booked with an advisor so I'll see what they say.

westonpa - I was a bit vauge. I am currently an underpaid, overachieving Sales Manager who is fed up with sales. I have had a very varied working career up till now though, including 18 months as the maintanance engineer in a vinyl pressing plant. My experience is not hugely relevant to the Electrical industry although I'm very technically minded good at math, physics etc.

I apreciate though, that none of this will count without any industry experience.

If I was to do a years studying what level could I hope to achieve - as I understand it the 2330 is a 2 year p/t course, is that right? Can it be completed in a year f/t? What sort of wages could I earn with the 2330? A lot of questions, I know! Thanks both for taking the time. Neil.
 11 May 2009 12:47 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

If you have been left some money and have some relevant level 3 qualifications why don't you consider a 2 - 3 year degree course for which you can get student loans, possibly an LEA non refundable grant and discount on your council tax. At the end of the course the economy should be on the up.

Regards.
 12 May 2009 12:01 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



NeilDay

Posts: 3
Joined: 10 May 2009

I have a lot to think about. Thanks again for your time and advice.
 10 June 2009 04:59 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



justiceinvestigator

Posts: 55
Joined: 25 July 2008

Originally posted by: gavinbowyer
Have been considering doing a homestudy course to get 2382 and 2391. Perhaps with www.tradequalified.co.uk or www.TotalElectricalTraining.com.


Just to clarify as unfairly misrepresented otherwise (although am sure that the original writer did not intend to do so), Total Electrical Training do not supply home-study courses - training is training room based and not correspondance.

In regards to the other guidance given above in becoming a qualified electrician - great advice/agreed!

Cheers!

-------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------
www.totalelectricaltraining.com
www.totalcommstraining.com
 08 October 2010 08:08 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



hateplasticsparks

Posts: 1
Joined: 08 October 2010

Hi Gavin

In my opinion there is no other route apart from an APPRENTICESHIP. As a qualified Electrician who served a 4 year apprenticeship i feel the experience is necessary and for those who go on site after doing college courses, well we all know who you are. Most sites now ask to see JIB cards which state that you have completed an apprenticeship and in my opinion is the correct way to go. At this current time there isn't much work about and for 'plastic' sparks to get jobs over those who have completed an apprenticeship is just wrong. I believe all agencys and companys should check if potential employees have completed an apprenticeship and candidates who have should be employed before those who havn't.
 28 November 2012 07:09 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



spark47

Posts: 1
Joined: 23 November 2010



Hi HatePlasticSparks

So is what you're saying that no one over the age of 18 should bother to train or retrain to be an electrician because they will be too old to be offered an apprenticeship?

Yes, I agree that there are a lot of '5 day wondercourse' so called sparkies, but when people are prepared to put in the time to become qualified they should get the recognition they deserve.

I'm time served, but I've worked alongside several 'mature' trainees who have put themselves through the training and have been in the process of becoming good electricians.

Experience comes with time and getting a few years of 'hands on' under your belt, but I bet some of these 'career changers' could give the old boys a run for there money when it comes to being keen and enthusiastic about the job and learning new skills.
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.