Library and Archives
Library and Archives
Decrease font size
Increase font size
1 2 >> Next
July 1, 2015
22nd IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Sub-Lieutenant W J Henry

Sub-Lieutenant Willoughby John Henry of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, attached to the ‘Anson’ Battalion, Royal Naval Division, died 4 June 1915, the 22nd member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Willoughby Henry was educated at Greenfield Hall School, Holywell, until 1899 when he was articled as a Pupil with W O Rooper & Co. of Chester, electrical engineers, and spent 5 years in that capacity at the company’s Victoria Works, Stafford. Upon termination of the pupillage in 1904 he was engaged by the company as an Assistant and employed at Chester and in London upon general electrical engineering and contracting work. Willoughby resigned from this position in 1905 then worked for a number of companies; as a Draughtsman and Assistant Engineer for Leo Sunderland & Co, electrical engineers, London; and as Chief Engineer to the Army and Navy Auxiliary Co-operative Supply Ltd of Westminster, London. In 1912 Willoughby resigned his position to go to Vancouver Island to join the real estate business of Beaven & Co of Victoria, BC, Canada, as a partner.

Following the declaration of war in August 1914, Willoughby left his business interests in the hands of his partners, returned immediately to Great Britain, and was given a Commission, with the temporary rank of Sub-Lieutenant, in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in September 1914. Willoughby’s Battalion left Great Britain in February 1915 and was sent to the Gallipoli Peninsula, via Egypt, where it was involved in the Battles of Helles (April 25 to June 6 1915) in this region. Towards the end of May 1915 a scheme was prepared for the resumption of an offensive (Third Battle of Krithia) and orders in connection with the attack were issued 3 June 1915. About noon on 4 June 1914 Henry’s Brigade rushed forward, and his Battalion captured the southern face of a Turkish redoubt. However later that day the Brigade had to fall back to its original position when its right flank became exposed. During the thick of the day’s fighting, while Willoughby was tending to a fellow officer, who had been severely wounded, he was shot through the heart by a rifle bullet and was killed instantaneously.

Sub-Lieutenant Henry’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 01 July 2015 09:49 AM     World War I     Comments (0)  

21st IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Second-Lieutenant H J G Davison

Second-Lieutenant Henry James Goddard Davison of the 13th (Service) Battalion, The Prince of Wales’s Own (West Yorkshire Regiment), attached to the 1st Battalion The Lancashire Fusiliers, died 4 June 1915, the 21st member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Henry Davison was educated at St Paul’s School London until 1905 when he entered Faraday House Electrical Engineering College, Southampton Row, London in May 1905 and took the course under Dr Alexander Russell (IEE President 1923-24). Henry completed the course in 1909 and was awarded the Faraday House Diploma after which he was engaged by The North Wales Power and Traction Company Ltd of Llanberis, and employed as a shift engineer. He spent 2 years at the Cwm Dyli hydro-electric power station, Carnarvon, during which he became Senior Charge Engineer. Henry then worked in a variety of positions for various companies; Assistant Commercial Engineer in the Foreign Department of Veritys Ltd, Birmingham; Assistant Electrical Engineer for consulting engineers Kincaid, Waller, Manville & Dawson in London; and Engineer in Charge of the Central Office and Power Station in Stowmarket, for the Suffolk Electricity Supply Company Ltd.

Following the declaration of war in August 1914, Henry relinquished his position to serve in the Army. Henry’s Battalion was sent to the Gallipoli Peninsula and was involved in the Battles of Helles (April 25 to June 6 1915) in this region. Towards the end of May 1915 a scheme was prepared for the resumption of an offensive (Third Battle of Krithia) and orders in connection with the attack were issued 3 June 1915. At noon on 4 June 1914 Henry’s Company ‘went over the top’. Whilst leading his Platoon forward Henry was hit and fell mortally wounded (almost the whole Platoon was killed). It was not until a month later that this portion of ground was eventually won by British troops and it became possible to bury the bodies of those who fell in action on 4 and 5 June 1915.

Second-Lieutenant Davison’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 01 July 2015 09:46 AM     World War I     Comments (0)  

20th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Sergeant G S Bradbury

Sergeant George Swanwick Bradbury of the I/6th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment (T F), died 4 June 1915, the 20th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

George Bradbury was educated at Manchester Grammar School which he left in 1900. He then worked for 3 years with Graham & Co. Ltd before being bound by indenture as a ‘School Apprentice (Electrical)’ with The British Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing Company Ltd. On completion of his apprenticeship in 1907 he was engaged by British Westinghouse as an Improver in the Testing Department where he spent 5 years. In 1910 George was given a position on the ‘outside staff’ in connection with the running and erection of turbo-generator sets. Eventually in 1912 he was appointed Tester on the company’s Electrical Testing Staff and in 1913 was appointed Foreman.

Following the declaration of war in August 1914, George received mobilization orders and was released from his civil occupation. George’s Battalion was eventually sent to the Gallipoli Peninsula and was involved in the Battles of Helles (April 25 to June 6 1915) in this region. Towards the end of May 1915 a scheme was prepared for the resumption of an offensive (Third Battle of Krithia) and orders in connection with the attack were issued 3 June 1915. At noon on 4 June 1914 his Brigade ‘went over the top’ and was involved in bitter fighting incurring heavy losses that day. On the conclusion of the battle George was reported missing. Nothing was heard of him after he went forward in the charge and as a consequence it was presumed that he was killed in action or died of his wounds on or after 4 June 1915.

Sergeant Bradbury’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 01 July 2015 09:42 AM     World War I     Comments (0)  

June 24, 2015
Early closure on Wednesday 24th June

The Library will be closing at 4pm on Wednesday 24th June due to an event booking. 

We apologise for any inconvenience to our users. 


   

    Posted By: Edward James Kemp @ 24 June 2015 10:43 AM     Service changes     Comments (0)  

June 22, 2015
19th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Corporal R P Hulton

Corporal Ralph Pacey Hulton of the Divisional Engineers, Royal Naval Division, died 1 June 1915, the 19th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Ralph Hulton became a Pupil with the Northallerton Electric Light and Power Company in 1901 where he spent two years gaining practical experience. Following the termination of his pupillage in 1903 Ralph joined Messrs Crompton & Co. of Chelmsford as an electrical engineer where he was principally employed in the Arc Lamp Testing Department. After leaving Crompton & Co. in 1909 he became Managing Director of Rowland & Hulton Ltd before giving up his directorship in 1911 to become a member of staff for Holophane Limited (Scientific Illumination) in London as a Commercial Engineer.

Following the declaration of war in August 1914, Ralph relinquished his position in order to serve in H.M. Forces. Ralph enlisted in September 1914 with the then newly raised Divisional Engineers, Royal Naval Division. In May 1915 Ralph’s Division was involved in fighting on the Gallipoli Peninsula. On May 30 1915 the 2nd (Naval) Brigade was in the front line, and as usual he was with his Section at Brigade Headquarters, being employed at the time on duties in connection with the maintenance of signal communications with the units manning the trenches. He was hit during the day by a stray bullet and was at once conveyed to hospital where an operation was performed for the extraction of the bullet. He succumbed to his injuries two days later (1 June 2015).

Corporal Hulton’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 22 June 2015 02:01 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

18th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Second-Lieutenant E Swinton

Second-Lieutenant Ernest Swinton of the Royal Field Artillery, died 28 May 1915, the 18th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Ernest Swinton, entered the University of Liverpool in 1909 and took a four year course in mechanical and electrical engineering. He joined the Liverpool Corporation Electric Supply Department in July 1913 and was appointed Station Engineer at the Corporation’s Lister Drive Power Station.

Following the declaration of war in August 1914, E Swinton relinquished his position in order to serve in the Army. He enlisted in the Royal Engineers in August 1914 and then was given a commission in the Royal Field Artillery in December 1914. Swinton’s Division was involved in the Battle of Festubert (May 15 to 25 1915). On the morning of the 18th May, Ernest went forward to reconnoitre a position for his trench mortars, and whilst doing so was severely wounded by the fragments of a shell that burst near him. He was immediately conveyed to No.7 Stationary Hospital, Boulogne. Poison had entered his system and it became necessary to amputate his right leg and arm. He was subsequently moved to the UK, and sent to St Thomas’s Hospital, Westminster, for treatment, where he succumbed to his wounds on May 28 1915.

Second-Lieutenant Swinton’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 22 June 2015 01:43 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

June 16, 2015
17th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Private E C H Slater

Private Eric Conrad Henry Slater of the I/6th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment, died 28 May 1915, the 17th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Eric C H Slater, having won a Town Scholarship, entered the Municipal Technical College, Brighton, in September 1908 and took the 3 year course in electrical engineering. In August 1911 he was engaged by The British Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company Ltd, Manchester, as a mechanic. Whilst employed with British Westinghouse Eric attended evening classes in electrical engineering subjects at the Municipal School of Technology, Manchester, and in October 1913 gained the degree of Batchelor of Science (Engineering) of the London University as an external student. British Westinghouse then moved Eric to a staff position in the company’s Editorial Department.

Following the declaration of war in August 1914, E C H Slater resigned his position in order to serve in the Army. By May 1915 after a brief spell in Egypt, Eric’s Division was sent to the Gallipoli Peninsula. Towards the end of May preparations were in hand for a major attack on the enemy’s positions at Krithia and Achi Baba. On 28 May, whilst Eric was doing a tour of duty in the front-line trenches; whilst on the look-out at the parapet on that day he was hit by a sniper’s bullet and killed instantaneously.

Private Slater’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 16 June 2015 02:22 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

16th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Private J Gilbert

Private Joseph Gilbert of the I/6th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment, died 28 May 1915, the 16th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Joseph Gilbert was born in Australia in 1884 and was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree from Adelaide University in 1907. He came to the UK in late 1909 and was employed by The British Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company where he worked in the testing department, then the contracts department, before becoming a commercial engineer.

Following declaration of the war in the summer of 1914, J Gilbert relinquished his position in order to serve in the Army and he enlisted in August 1914. By May 1915 after a brief spell in Egypt, Joseph’s Division was sent to the Gallipoli Peninsula. His Battalion was on May 27 in the support trenches on the left front of his Brigade, near the ‘vineyard’, south of Krithia. In the evening, he was advancing with his unit to the site of new trenches, which were to be dug beyond the British lines and nearer the enemy’s position, when he was hit by a bullet. He was conveyed to the Casualty Clearing Station at ‘Lancashire Landing’, where he succumbed to his wounds on the following day.

Private Gilbert’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 16 June 2015 02:20 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

May 29, 2015
15th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Private N V Lloyd

Private Norman Victor Lloyd of the I/6th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment, died 27 May 1915, the 15th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

N V Lloyd entered the Municipal School of Technology, Manchester, in 1903, with a Manchester Corporation Scholarship and took the 3 year course in electrical engineering under Professor Schwartz. He then became a ‘College Apprentice (Electrical)’ with The British Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company. Following termination of the apprenticeship, he was engaged by the British Westinghouse Company, and appointed a Correspondent in the company’s Sales Management Department.

Upon declaration of the war in the summer of 1914, N V Lloyd relinquished his position in order to serve in the Army. By May 1915 after a brief spell in Egypt Norman’s Division was sent to the Gallipoli Peninsula. On the night of May 27th, his Battalion went forward to dig a new line of trenches within a short distance of the Turkish position at Krithia; he was hit during the advance to the site of the new line and mortally wounded. He was placed on a stretcher and whilst being conveyed to the Regimental Aid Post succumbed to his injuries.

Private Lloyd’s obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 

 

 

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 29 May 2015 05:10 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

IEE Institutional Involvement in WW1 - Council Minutes Extracts - May 1915

Council meeting of 27 May 1915

“468. The following reports and recommendations of the Finance Committee on various matters were adopted [only minute (b) showing]:

(b) Further enlistment of members of the staff.

The following members of the staff have applied for and have been granted permission to enlist (see Minute No.338(b), 14 January 1915):-

Name                   Age       Salary         Length of Service           Remark

H J Nunn             26          £110           12 ¼ years                      Married

C W Skinner       20            £80             2 ¼ years                       Single

F C Harris           17            £50             2 ½ years                       Single

The places of these employees will be kept open for them. In the case of Mr Nunn, the Committee have decided to pay him half salary and also the amount (about £5) of his contributions under the Staff Provident Scheme. In the case of Mr Skinner and Mr Harris, the Committee propose to pay no salary.”

“470. The President brought before the Council proposals which he had received from Mr H W Handcock in connection with

(a) making arrangements with the war Office for the employment in electricity supply stations of Territorials who have enlisted for Home Service only.

(b) the issue of certificates of exemption from military service of employees of electricity supply stations who cannot be spared (see Minute No.433, 15 April 1915).

It was agreed to inform Mr Handcock that the Council are unable to take action as suggested, and that the matters could best be dealt with as part of a scheme of national organisation.

It was further agreed to refer to the National Service Committee the question of employing disabled soldiers as switchboard attendants.”

“472. The President reported that at the Conference held on 6th May (see Minute No.449, 29 April 1915) of representatives of gas and electricity undertakings, resolutions were carried calling upon the government to take steps

(a) to increase the output of coal from the pits;

(b) to give greater facilities for the transport of coal by rail;

(c) to have regard, in requisitioning steam colliers, to the requirements of the public utility undertakings which depend for their supplies on sea-borne coal;

(d) to reduce the price of coal to reasonable limits;

and that a deputation had

(a) attended on the Coal Exports Control Committee appointed by the government, and laid before them the views of the Conference; and

(b) arranged for a Conference with Members of Parliament at the House of Commons at 5 o’clock on Wednesday, the 9th June.”

[Note: there were no Council meetings in June 1915]

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 29 May 2015 04:20 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

May 20, 2015
13th and 14th IEE Members to Fall in World War 1

Lieutenant Sidney Gudgeon of the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion, attached to 2nd Battalion, The Manchester Regiment, died 14 May 1915, the 13th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Second-Lieutenant Harry Gustav Byng of the 2nd Battalion, The Border Regiment, died 16 May 1915, the 14th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

Sidney Gudgeon was employed in the Drawing Office of Electromotors Limited as an Electrical Designer when war was declared and relinquished his position in order to serve in the Army. On May 14 1915 he was superintending a working party of his unit engaged in digging new trenches near the German lines and they were working under continuous rifle fire from the Germans. Sidney was hit by a stray bullet, which pierced his heart and killed him instantaneously.

Harry Gustav Byng was the 3rd son of Gustav Byng, founder and First Chairman of The General Electric Company. After completing his studies at Harvard University in the USA, then exploring Canada, he spent a few months as a pupil with The General Electric Company of Schenectady, NY in 1913, before returning to the UK in late 1913 with the intention of taking up a position in his father’s company. When war was declared he decided to serve in the Army and enlisted. In the early hours of May 16 1915 there was an attack against the German position south of Festubert. Harry’s Division carried out this attack. Harry’s Battalion which was on the extreme left of the Division was held up for a time. Then whilst he was leading his Platoon forward in the attack, he was mortally wounded and died on the field at the spot where he had been struck down.

Lieutenant Gudgeon’s and Second-Lieutenant Byng’s obituaries were published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 20 May 2015 10:21 AM     World War I     Comments (0)  

May 14, 2015
Nuclear Reactor Plates in the IET Archives

Amongst the items held by the IET Archives are two nuclear reactor plates taken from the Merlin nuclear reactor. However, there is no need for the archivists to get out a Geiger counter every time we bring out the plates because they are information plaques attached to the outside of the reactor. The first plaque, shown below is from the opening of the reactor in November 1959.

 

 

The Merlin Reactor and Aldermaston

Merlin was a 5 MW research reactor at Aldermaston Court, Aldermaston, Berkshire, England, which operated from 6 November 1959 until 1962 before its license was revoked/surrendered in 1963. It was the first commercial scientific reactor in Britain and was privately owned and operated by Associated Electrical Industries (AEI). A British Pathé recording of the opening of the reactor (without sound) can be found on the British Pathé website here - Merlin Reactor Opening.

Aldermaston Court is a country house and park built in the Victorian era for the British Member of Parliament, Daniel Higford Davall Burr (1811-1885) with elements incorporated from buildings of earlier centuries that had been present on the site. In 1939 AEI bought the house and immediate grounds for £16,000, but despite this purchase, the government soon earmarked the location for an airfield, RAF Aldermaston. During WWII the land and house were requisitioned by the government as a barracks for the Women’s Land Army.

After the war, the airfield remained in use but after the airfield’s closure in 1950, the park was returned to AEI, which used it as a plasma research laboratory. AEI built the now demolished reactor between the house and its lake. This facility became the UK’s Atomic Weapons Research Establishment later the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) for research, commissioning, and de-commissioning of most such weapons.

How did the plaques come under the care of the IET Archives?

A little of the provenance of these items is unclear but they most likely came into the archives with the donation of the papers of Douglas Richard Chick, FIEE.

In 1946 Chick joined the Research Laboratory of AEI at Aldermaston, where he was appointed Section Leader of the Nuclear Physics Section. He later became Group Leader of the newly-formed Nuclear Sciences Group. In 1963, after the closure of the Merlin reactor, Chick moved to become Research Manager of the Vickers Company Research Laboratory, Ascot, where he remained until 1966, when he was appointed Professor and Head of the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the new University of Surrey. The Chick papers include many of AEI’s research papers including reports about the Merlin reactor.

The second plaque, which is shown below, perhaps hints at the frustration of the engineers, technicians and scientists at Aldermaston when the Merlin reactor was shut down in 1962.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 14 May 2015 09:01 AM     Archives     Comments (0)  

May 8, 2015
12th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Sapper P A E Warburton

 

Sapper Piers Acton Eliot Warburton of the New Zealand Engineers, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, died 2 May 1915, the 12th member of the IEE to die in World War 1.

P A E Warburton moved from New Zealand to British Columbia, Canada, in June 1912 where he had obtained an appointment with the West Kootenay Power Company. He was working for this company when war was declared with Germany. When in August 1914 the Canadian Government announced its intention to raise troops for service in France, he offered himself as a recruit for the First Contingent of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Being rejected on account of his eyesight, he resigned his position immediately and moved to England where he applied to be enrolled in the Divisional Engineers, Royal Naval Division. Again he was refused on account of his eyesight.

Strong representations were made on his behalf to the Military Authorities and he was eventually permitted to enlist in the British Section of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force which sailed for Egypt in December 1914. Sapper Warburton’s Division was then allotted to the newly created Mediterranean Expeditionary Force which was intended to invade the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey, and his Division sailed for Turkey from Egypt in early April 1915. Whilst ‘on the sap’ at Quinn’s Post, Turkey, on April 30 1915, he was mortally wounded, being shot in the head by a sniper. He immediately became unconscious and was conveyed to the Hospital Ship Mashobra. Sapper Warburton succumbed to his wounds 2 days later (May 2nd).

Sapper Warburton's obituary was published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

Edited: 08 May 2015 at 11:29 AM by Jonathan Cable

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 08 May 2015 11:17 AM     World War I     Comments (0)  

May 1, 2015
Can You Really Trust a Label?

On occasion objects come into the archive collections which are labelled and usually these labels are taken at face value unless there is good reason to believe otherwise. However, we recently examined an object label which caused us to question the accuracy of the information on the label.

Through a chance set of circumstances two particular boxes of objects were brought back to the IET Archive Centre from storage at the same time. Once those boxes had arrived it was noticed that the online catalogue showed two items with a different reference number, supposedly one in each box, and each with an identical description.

The description for both items was ‘gavel set presented to the IEE by the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Technician Engineers upon the centenary of the IEE in 1971’.

The first thought was that there must be some duplication in the catalogue and there was an expectation that upon examining the contents of the boxes we would find that only one gavel existed. However, when we opened the boxes we did find a gavel set in each box.

The first gavel (new reference OPC/1/161/7) is shown below:

The wood for the gavel and stand match (wood colour and grain) and there is a metal engraved plate which says ‘THE INSTITUTION OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS - CENTENARY YEAR. Presented by the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Technician Engineers, 17 May 1971'

The second gavel (new reference OPC/1/161/9) is shown below:

 

 

The mount (in 2 sections), with typed label glued to the base, and its associated gavel appear to be a second gavel gift set (the set is the same colour and wood grain - though these are different from the first gavel set) presented by the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Technician Engineers to the IEE upon its centenary in 1971.

Which is the real gavel presented by the IEETE to the IEE in 1971?

Whilst it is possible that the IEETE gavel the IEE two sets of gavels and stands this would be highly unusual. If the IEETE only presented one gavel set then the question becomes which set is likely to be the genuine set? Our belief is that the top gavel set is the original as someone has gone to the effort of having a metal plate engraved and this would be an appropriate treatment for a centenary presentation gift from one professional body to another. It is also unlikely that an organisation would stick a typed label to such a high profile gift.

Our guess, and it is no better than a guess, is that the second gavel set was discovered without a label at some point after 1971 and that it was assumed to be the IEETE’s gavel gift. The 1970s was a period well before the advent of archive cataloguing software and tracking tools such as barcodes and even the IEE’s Archives only came into existence after 1970.

The catalogue entries for these two gavel sets have now been amended to refer to each other and to mention the uncertainty about the provenance of the second gavel set.

Note: The IEETE and the IEE are both predecessor organisations of the IET. The IEETE, after a number of mergers and name changes, was one of the organisations that merged to form the IIE in 1998, which itself merged with the IEE in 2006 to form the IET.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 01 May 2015 04:54 PM     Archives     Comments (0)  

April 30, 2015
11th IEE Member to Fall in World War 1 - Lance-Corporal C H Hill

Lance-Corporal Charles Haydock Hill of the 16th Battalion (The Canadian Scottish) Manitoba Regiment, Canadian Expeditionary Force, died 28 April 1915, the 11th member of the IEE to die in World War 1. He was an Inspector in the Light and Power Department of the British Columbia Electrical Railway Company Ltd of Victoria, B.C., Canada, when the war was declared in summer 1914 and he relinquished his position shortly thereafter to serve in the Army.

Charles enlisted 31 August 1914 in the 50th Battalion (Gordon Highlanders of Canada) British Columbia Regiment, then stationed in Victoria, BC, where his military training was begun. He was drafted on September 23 to the 16th Battalion (The Canadian Scottish) Manitoba Regiment, one of the units of the First Contingent raised for active service in Europe. He was appointed a Lance-Corporal on the day of his transfer and sent to Valcartier Camp, Quebec, where his training continued until the First Canadian Contingent sailed for England.

In late April 1915 following heavy fighting which had lasted for many days Charles’ Brigade was sent on 25 April to the reserve trenches on the banks of the Yser Canal, behind the front line. Shortly after his arrival as he was about to enter a dug-out a high-explosive shell fire by the German artillery burst near him; he was hit by its fragments, which shot off both his legs. He was at once conveyed to No.18 Casualty Clearing Station, where he lingered on until April 28, and then passed away, owing to the intense shock caused to his system by the severity of his wounds.

A photograph of Lance-Corporal Hill, and his obituary were published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

Edited: 30 April 2015 at 09:47 AM by Jonathan Cable

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 30 April 2015 09:39 AM     World War I     Comments (0)  

April 23, 2015
IEE Institutional Involvement in WW1 - Council Minutes Extracts - April 1915

Council meeting of 15 April 1915

“The following replies were reported as having been received in answer to the Council’s circular (see Minute No.407, 25 March 1915) to ascertain how many members, residing in the London area, would be willing to join the proposed Engineers’ Volunteer Training Corps:-

Class                           Affirmative         Doubtful             Negative              Total

Members                     19                      29                      21                         69

Associate Members   39                     26                      33                         98

Associates                     6                        9                        4                         19

Graduates                      1                        3                        7                         11

Students                         3                        1                      11                         15

TOTAL                           68                      68                      76                      212

It was agreed that this information be placed at the disposal of the Central Association Volunteer Corps so that enrolment forms may be issued by them, and that the views of the Local Section Committees in Great Britain be obtained before any action is taken in regard to members residing outside the London area.”

“The President reported that he had received a letter from the Institution of Civil Engineers asking him and another member to be nominated by the Council, to associate themselves with the President of the Institution of Civil Engineers and Sir John Wolfe Barry KCB, FRS, in making some representation to the Local Government Board, and subsequently if necessary, to the Treasury, with reference to the subject of the discrimination to be used in the restriction of expenditure upon engineering works for the public service at the present time (see Minute No.397, 11 March 1915) and to its bearing upon engineering and other activities in regard to the conclusion of the war.

It was agreed that Mr C P Sparks be appointed to serve with the President in this capacity.”

“The President brought before Council certain suggestions made to him by Mr Lawford Grant, Local Honorary Secretary for Canada, in regard to taking steps for the formation of a Local Centre of the Institution in Canada.

It was agreed that a draft letter, to be approved at the next meeting, be sent to Mr Grant explaining that, in the opinion of the Council, the present time is inopportune for adopting the proposal, but that it will be further considered after the termination of the war.”

“Letters (10 February and 30 March 1915) were read from Mr A V Mason inquiring whether anything can be done in regard to issuing badges to Central Station Engineers who have been prevented from joining His Majesty’s Forces on account of their services being required for the working of electricity stations.

It was agreed to inform him that the Council cannot undertake to issue badges as proposed, but that it is understood that certain supply companies have already done so on their own initiative.”

Council meeting of 29 April 1915

“The President reported that he had received letters from the President of the Institution of Gas Engineers pointing out the difficulties which are being experienced in connection with coal as regards:-

(a) depleted stocks;

(b) difficulty in obtaining fresh supplies;

(c) abnormal prices;

and suggesting a National Conference or representatives of gas and electricity undertakings to discuss the question of making concerted representations to the government on the matter, and asking the Council to grant the use of the lecture theatre for this purpose n Thursday 6th May at 3pm.

It was unanimously resolved:

(1) to agree to the suggested Conference and to grant the use of the lecture theatre as requested.

(2) that each electricity undertaking in the United Kingdom be invited by circular to send a delegate to the Conference, the Institution of Gas Engineers sending a similar circular to the gas undertakings.

(3) that Mr J S Highfield and Mr C P Sparks be appointed to attend a joint meeting at the Institution of Gas Engineers on Friday 30th April, to make the preliminary arrangements.”

“The President reported that at the request of the Engineering Adviser of the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps, enrolment forms had been sent on its behalf to those who had expressed willingness to join the proposed Engineer Volunteer Training Corps.”

“A letter (29 March 1915) was read from the Honorary Secretary of the Engineer’s Unit of the National Guard, asking the Council to appoint a representative of the Institution to serve on the Committee which is being formed to manage the affairs of that Unit.

It was agreed that in view of the negotiations now in progress no useful purpose can be served by appointing a representative as desired.”



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 23 April 2015 01:31 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

WWI Experiences of Philip Vassar Hunter, IEE President 1933 and Honorary Fellow 1951

P V Hunter was the IEE’s President in 1933 was also made an Honorary Fellow of the IEE in 1951. The IEE recorded a film of him in 1951 and the film script reveals his experiences working in the Navy’s Anti-Submarine Division in WWI. His story, extracted from that script, is as follows;

“During the latter part of the 1914-1918 war, I was loaned to the Naval Staff as Chief Engineer of the Experiments and Research Section of the Anti-Submarine Division, engaged on developing new methods and devices for anti-submarine warfare. Captain W W Fisher RN was Head of the Division and Professor W H Bragg was Chief Scientific Officer. We three formed a Committee under the Chairmanship of Captain Fisher, which controlled all new work in the development of anti-submarine warfare. I was soon satisfied that the only method likely to give positive results was the supersonic echo. This was being developed by a young Canadian physicist named Dr Boyle who had been a pupil of Rutherford at Montreal. His scheme was to utilise the pieso-electric effect of quartz to produce supersonic reflections from the hull of a submarine. This all seems quite commonplace now but in 1917 it was, even by skilled technicians and physicists, regarded as visionary and impracticable. However, Boyle stuck to his guns and I shall never forget the day when he took me on board his little pinnace [note: a pinnace is a ship’s light boat propelled by oars or sails] in Harwich Harbour and, by means of lash-up equipment, obtained echoes from the submarines and destroyers lying at anchor there.”



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 23 April 2015 01:21 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

April 10, 2015
Early History of the IEE in the North-East and a Recent Discovery

The first local centre of the Institution of Electrical Engineers in the North-East was the Newcastle Local Section which was formed in 1899. The Teesside Branch was spun out of this Section in 1912 and became the Teesside Sub-Centre in 1919 whilst the Newcastle Local Section itself changed its name to the North-Eastern Centre in 1919.

A Recent Discovery of Early Minutes Belonging to the Newcastle Local Section

In 2014, a donation was made to the IET Archives of the minute book of the Newcastle Section (archive reference IET/CEN/15/1/94). The donor had no idea how the minute book came to be in his attic but we were nevertheless very grateful to receive this wonderful volume. The minute book covers the period 1913 to 1921 and includes not only the minutes of the Newcastle Local Section Committee and its successor the North-Eastern Centre Committee but also includes minutes of the Teesside Branch Committee.

Other than a list of the members of the 1913-1914 Dinner Committee pasted to the inside cover, the first entries are for the Annual General Meeting of the Section held in Armstrong College on Monday 26 May 1913 and the 12th Committee Meeting of the Section for the 1912-13 session held again at Armstrong College, Monday 22 September 1913. These first entries are shown below.

 

 

The minute book gives a particularly valuable insight into the regional activities of the IEE. Until the discovery of this volume the IET Archives only held the minutes of the North-Eastern Centre dating from after 1920.

Formal regional groupings of IEE members around the UK were called Centres for most of the 20th century. Centres organised most of their own affairs, and whilst they would usually send copies of their minutes to the IEE at Savoy Place in London they were under no obligation to send their original records to the IEE’s archives. The original IEE Centre minutes that exist today in the IET Archives are those that particular centres chose of their own volition to send to London and several gaps remain in the series of Centre minutes.

Are minutes really that interesting?

The IEE Centre minute books from the early 20th century are quite unlike a modern set of minutes where there is typically only a brief record of a meeting and where much of the detail is in the supporting reports. The early minute books were written in great detail, were very wide ranging and contain much social history as well as personal opinions.

As might be expected the Newcastle Local Section minute book contains details of lectures, visits, and dinners that formed key elements of the Section programme. For example the first lecture mentioned, which was given at the 1913 AGM, was on the subject of ‘notes on gas engines’ given by Albert P Pyne (many years later Albert became the Chairman of the Section). The September 1913 Committee minutes noted a recent visit to see the SS Tynemouth at the Walker Shipyard belonging to the famous shipbuilders Messrs Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson. Swan Hunter was well-known in the early 20th century for its building of RMS Carpathia in 1903 and RMS Mauretania in 1913. The SS Tynemouth of Newcastle was stranded off the coast of Northumberland in May 1913 and was probably in the Swan Hunter shipyard for repairs. The 1913 Board of Trade wreck report on the Tynemouth can be found here - SS Tynemouth wreck report. 

The minutes also discuss cooperation with the IEE in London and subjects of particular interest to the Section/Centre. There is also an example of the Centre adopting a different attitude to the IEE Council. In March 1919 the Centre Committee wrote to other Centres about an IEE Council decision to support a Board of Trade report on electric power supply with which the North-Eastern Centre ‘regretfully’ could not concur.

There is a significant amount of coverage in the minutes of the relationship of the Section/Centre with other technical and engineering organisations in the region such as the Junior Institution of Engineers and given the period covered there is a large amount of material relating to WWI.

The extract from the minutes shown below comes from a meeting held Monday 30 July 1917 in the boardroom of another famous North-Eastern engineering company, Merz & McLellan. The minutes shown discuss the proposed formation of an Electric Light & Signal Company and the committee proposed seeking the immediate cooperation of the Chamber of Commerce Electrical Section to organise a mass meeting of the electrical industry to bring this about.

 

 

Prominent and Noted Engineers Involved with the North-Eastern Centre

Many well-known engineers were Committee members and they have signed the pages of the minutes or have added entries by hand. These individuals include;

C Vernier (Section Chairman 1913).

Philip Vassar Hunter (Section Chairman 1914-1916 and President of the IEE 1933).

Henry William Clothier (Section Chairman 1916-1917).

Albert Henry Weaver Marshall (Section Chairman 1917-1918).

Albert P Pyne (Centre Chairman 1918-1919).

William Cross (Centre Chairman 1919-1920).

James Robert Beard (Centre Chairman 1920-1921 and President of the IEE 1940).

The eminence of the individuals can be illustrated by Philip Vassar Hunter (photograph below).

 

 

Philip Vassar Hunter was made the Head of the Electrical Department of Merz & McLellan in 1909, was loaned to the Naval Staff as Chief Engineer of the Experiments and Research Section of the Anti-Submarine Division for WWI, and after the war became Joint Manager and Chief Engineer of Callender’s Cable and Construction Company. When British Insulated Callender’s Cable Co (BICC) was formed in 1945 he became a Director and Engineer-in-Chief and later he became Deputy Chairman of the company.

P V Hunter as well as being the IEE’s President in 1933 was also made an Honorary Fellow of the IEE in 1951 and the IEE recorded a film of him in 1951 as it did of many other Honorary Fellows and Faraday medallists. The IET Archives holds film files including the scripts for many of these films including that of P V Hunter in which he talks about his experiences and work in WWI and WWII and the power distribution work carried out by Merz in the early 20th century.

History of Technology TPN Event in Newcastle – June 2015

There has always been a strong relationship between engineering and the North East of England and on the weekend of 6-7 June 2015 at the Newcastle Discovery Museum there will be a conference on the history of power generation, distribution, utilisation and other engineering specialisms. This conference is being organised by the History of Technology TPN and there will be an opportunity to visit the Discovery Museum’s ‘Arcs and Sparks’ collection. There will also be an optional visit on Sunday 7th June to Cragside House, a National Trust property which was the first private residence to employ hydroelectric power.



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 10 April 2015 03:09 PM     Archives     Comments (0)  

April 9, 2015
8th, 9th and 10th IEE Members to Fall in World War 1

Three IEE members fell in quick succession in the first few days of April 1915. Major Henry Herbert Stanley Marsh died 2nd April 1915, Lance-Sergeant Edgar Hoyle died 5th April 1915 and Trumpeter Norman Victor Foote died 7 April 1915.

Major H H S Marsh, a Canadian, commanded the 4th Field Company, 2nd London Division Engineers. His company was detailed on 1 April 1915 to dig some new trenches about 200 yards from the enemy’s line near Givenchy. While he was superintending the work he was hit in the abdomen and left hand by the fragments of a German shell which exploded nearby. He was conveyed to the Military Hospital at Béthune, where he succumbed to his injuries the following day.

Lance-Sergeant E Hoyle joined the Honourable Artillery Company shortly after the outbreak of war and was posted to its 1st Infantry Division. In January 1915 his Battalion was transferred to the 7th Infantry Brigade (3rd Division) and in March 1915 Edgar was promoted to Lance-Sergeant. On 5th April his unit was ordered to take over some trenches near Voormezeele to the west of St. Eloi. Having arrived at the point of the line to be held by his Company, he superintended the movement of his men into the bays assigned to his Platoon and had just begun speaking to his brother (Leonard Arthur Hoyle, AMIEE) who was serving in the Battalion with him at the time, when the enemy opened fire. Edgar was hit in the chest by a rifle bullet and died a few minutes later.

Trumpeter N V Foote, an Australian, as soon as the Government of the Commonwealth made known its intention to raise a Force for active service in Europe, re-enlisted in the First Contingent raised in Australia for the purpose, and was posted to his former regiment, now one of the units of the 1st Australian Light Horse Brigade. He sailed in the Star of England for Egypt 25 September 1914. On 30 January 1915, on his Regiment moving from Meadi, he accompanied his Squadron and went into camp with it at Zietun. Later his Squadron was stationed at Heliopolis. Whilst there he became ill with pneumonia, and was at once admitted into the Station Military Hospital, where 10 days later on 7 April 1915, he succumbed to his illness.

Photographs of Major Marsh, Lance-Sergeant Hoyle, and Trumpeter Foote and their obituaries were published in the IEE World War I Honour Roll and these details have been reproduced below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



-------------------------
Jon Cable
Assistant Archivist
The Institution of Engineering and Technology

   

    Posted By: Jonathan Cable @ 09 April 2015 03:40 PM     World War I     Comments (0)  

April 8, 2015
New content from Knovel

The IET library subscribes to nearly 300 full text book titles from Knovel. This content is updated yearly to refresh the selection and add new content into the subscription.

Knovel

Here, I will give a brief outline of four titles:

The most used resource last year was:
Electrical Engineer's Reference Book (16th Edition)
Laughton, M.A.; Warne, D.F.


Electrical Engineer's Reference Book (16th Edition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This text covers the following subject sections: General principles; materials and processes; control, power electronics and drives; environment; power generation; transmission and distribution; power systems; sectors of electricity use.

We also have a new edition of the popular:
Machinery's Handbook (29th Edition)
Oberg, Erik; Jones, Franklin D.; Horton, Holbrook L.; Ryffel, Henry H
Machinery's Handbook (29th Edit

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our new additions include:
Wind Power - The Industry Grows Up
Busby, Rebecca L.

Wind Power - The Industry Grows Up

 

 

 

 

 

 

A balanced and comprehensive view of the wind power industry

Simple Solutions to Energy Calculations (5th Edition)
Vaillencourt, Richard
Simple Solutions to Energy Calculations (5th Edition)

Building managers identify what to look for and how to evaluate before making a decision about which guarantee is better for their building and which ESCO can best deliver energy savings.

To see a video of a Basic search tutorial

To access the service:

Sign into the IET website and go to:

http://www.theiet.org/resources/library/virtual-library/knovel/index.cfm

 



Edited: 10 April 2015 at 08:54 AM by Mike Dunne



   

    Posted By: Mike Dunne @ 08 April 2015 03:33 PM     Library     Comments (0)  

1 2 >> Next

FuseTalk Standard Edition - © 1999-2015 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.