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Topic Title: Wiring with flex stranded cable
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Created On: 08 June 2017 11:43 AM
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 08 June 2017 11:43 AM
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21j

Posts: 4
Joined: 08 June 2017

Hi,
Can any tell me if there would be a problem wiring sockets in a garage using 2.5mm stranded cable from an extension lead?
The cable would be contained within 50 x 50 trunking and 20mm galv conduit.
Thanks
 08 June 2017 12:31 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 15812
Joined: 13 August 2003

There's no particular objection to using flexible conductors as such, just be aware that the current-carrying capacity of flexes can be slightly lower than either T&E or singles (both because of the circular sheath and different manufacturing tolerances for the conductors of flexes) and that some accessory terminals might not be designed for finely stranded conductors (but ferruling the ends would mitigate that problem).
- Andy.
 08 June 2017 12:42 PM
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broadgage

Posts: 2380
Joined: 07 August 2007

It is rather an odd way of proceeding, but nothing prohibits use of flexible conductors for fixed wring.

There USED to be a specific prohibition, but that was removed some years ago.
 08 June 2017 12:53 PM
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21j

Posts: 4
Joined: 08 June 2017

Thanks. Its just that I have a lot of this type of cable around and it would save buying new.
 08 June 2017 01:09 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 9348
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Because it is soft skinned compared to ordinary fixed wire, you may need to be a bit more thoughtful then normal about exposure to mechanical damage when outside the trunking, and glanded/ grommeted where it passes in and out.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 08 June 2017 01:35 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 1336
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Nothing 'wrong' with using up some flex to wire a few sockets up in the garage.
I recently used up some blue artic flex to wire up some garage lights in a mates garage, he was well impressed with the 'blue' cable.
Clipped direct to the ceiling joists , and run down in T2 trunking for the switch drops.
I try to use up all off cuts and ends of drums where possible and nothing worse than a van full of odd drums of flex or FP with 5 or 6 metres left on the roll.
Use it up folks , cable is cable
 10 June 2017 11:47 PM
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sparkingchip

Posts: 9953
Joined: 18 January 2003

Not quite.

Blue artic flex used for fixed wiring?

Andy B
 11 June 2017 09:05 AM
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alancapon

Posts: 6879
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Originally posted by: dustydazzler
. . . Use it up folks , cable is cable . . .

That depends. Although called "arctic", is it to BS6500 or BS7919 Table 44? Both these cables are available with blue, yellow & orange outer jackets, however, cable to BS7919 Table 44 is only suitable for use at 110V, and was intended for use with 55V - 0V - 55V site transformers & tools. It is not suitable for use at normal mains voltages. In my previous job, I had a box of confiscated extension leads made from blue arctic cable to BS7919 (often found powering portable radios on construction jobs).

Regards,

Alan.
 11 June 2017 09:22 AM
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dustydazzler

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The drum of cable I have is 3183yag , rated 240v 16a
I was taught at college that the blue and orange versions can used at domestic mains voltage 240v , the yellow was strictly for 110v
I used to do work for a shop fitters , they specified blue arctic cable for wiring all refrigeration and freezer units lights which were powered at 240v
Blooming heck , I have about 15m of blue arctic on a roll. #whatdoiusethisfornow
 11 June 2017 10:26 AM
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alancapon

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That is usually the colour coding used: Blue = 230V, Yellow = 110V. However, these colour combinations are available in both standard. You just need to check you aren't trying to use BS7917 for 230V.

Regards,

Alan.
 11 June 2017 02:54 PM
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weirdbeard

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Originally posted by: alancapon

That is usually the colour coding used: Blue = 230V, Yellow = 110V. However, these colour combinations are available in both standard. You just need to check you aren't trying to use BS7917 for 230V.




HI Alan, I am a bit confused why the DNO would go about confiscating folks extension leads for their radios? perhaps you are thinking of fixed construction and demolition site installations, section 704, reg 704.522.8.1, but that says bs7919 cable can be used for both RLV and voltages exceeding RLV, either way, for the The OPs garage I agree with dusty, and there can be advantages of using flex over twin and earth for its flexibility

-------------------------
:beer)
 11 June 2017 03:08 PM
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alancapon

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You misunderstand. This was construction works by a contractor on one of our sites. If cable is made to a standard for use at 110V, such as BS7919 Table 44, then it should bot be used at 230V.

Regards,

Alan.
 11 June 2017 03:44 PM
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weirdbeard

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Originally posted by: alancapon

You misunderstand. This was construction works by a contractor on one of our sites. If cable is made to a standard for use at 110V, such as BS7919 Table 44, then it should bot be used at 230V.



Here's a link to an example of bs7919 table 44 cable:

http://www.aeicables.co.uk/pro...919:2001%20Table%2044

I agree that this particular cable is not suitable for voltages over RLV for the fixed wiring of a construction or demolition site according to BS7671 section 704, it would be fine for the OP to use in his garage, as for your confiscated extension leads, i don't think BS7671 applies

-------------------------
:beer)
 11 June 2017 06:13 PM
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dustydazzler

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I was asked by a mate to fit strip light and move the switch position in his garage, just so happened to use a few yards of blue 1.5 arctic flex on a part roll sitting around, made a nice job of it using a bit of mini trunk for the new switch drop , Proper job and all that jazz
If I had happened to have some left over FP or flat T&e I would have used that instead
Back to the OP I don't see nothing wrong with wiring a garage socket in 2.5 flexible if that is what he has to hand.
I have never come across a ref that forbids flex to used to wire a light fitting , but if there is one I missed it .. whoops
 11 June 2017 08:47 PM
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alancapon

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The reg that banned flexible cable being used in the fixed installation was removed in the 16th edition.

Regards,

Alan.
 11 June 2017 11:22 PM
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mapj1

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Indeed is not only not banned, but actively recommended for 'fixed' wiring in things like motor homes and caravans, as being less likely to fracture. It is worth having a bag of bootlace ferrules however for certain terminal designs fail epically on stranded.
Can't actually see a problem other than one of expectations with using a yellow cable at 230v when the makers data specifies it for 300/500V. So not on 690V 3 phase, but fine at normal 230/400.
Actually I bet it would be fine on 690 as well most of the time, just they don't want to test it to a more exacting standard.

Site rules confiscating unofficial leads are one thing, and understandable, as breaking the site colour code which is there for a reason, but the reality of where electrons actually come out and bite you are another thing entirely.

Now what about a 3 hole BS4343 socket to allow chaining of yellow festoon light cables that are only 2 core ?
That really is against regs, of course, but quite common, and safe if done properly, so long as made impossible to plug anything into the end of the lighting run that is expecting an earth.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 13 June 2017 01:21 PM
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21j

Posts: 4
Joined: 08 June 2017

Thank you very much for all replies. It going to save me buying additional cable.
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