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Road Traffic Accident Investigation, Case Studies

Lecture

Image of three blue heads in profile on grey background

Crashed your car? What caused it? Whose fault was it?

Date and Time

14 June 2018 - 18:30-21:00

Location

Coventry, United Kingdom - icon_popup  (See map)

Organiser

Organised by the UK - W.Mids:Coventry&Warks local network.


About this event


Speaker: Jonathan Stubbs, Chairman, Institute of Road Traffic Investigators


Programme


T&C at 6:30pm for the lecture at 7:00pm. Networking buffet afterwards.

Continuing Professional Development

CPD logo declaring this event can contribute 1 hours towards your Continuing Professional Development

This event can contribute towards your Continuing Professional Development (CPD) as part of the IET's CPD monitoring scheme.

Additional information


Frequently the actual cause of a road traffic accident requires a full engineering investigation.

Jonathan is the Managing Director of Stubbs Traffic Accident Reconstruction Services Ltd.  And Chairman, Institute of Road Traffic Investigators. He has investigated accidents in many different countries.

These case studies will show how the initial thoughts of the police, etc, were either confirmed or completely changed through proper forensic and engineering investigation.

Please download and circulate the poster

Registration information


Registration not essential but please register to help with refreshment planning.


Register

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