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The unexpected impact of basic science: how the search for Black Holes and the Higgs Boson impacts society and economy

Lecture

Image of three blue heads in profile on grey background

There really should be no distinction between "basic" and "applied" research. Even the most fundamental research about the nature of the universe, like last year's discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN, has a huge impact on the economy and society.

Date and Time

13 February 2013 - 18:00-21:00

Location

London, United Kingdom - icon_popup  (See map)

Organiser

Organised by the London local network.


About this event

This lecture will outline that there really should be no distinction between "basic" and "applied" research. Even the most fundamental research about the nature of the universe, like last year's discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN, has a huge impact on the economy and society.  This is because of its key role in attracting people into STEM careers, and also because this kind of science drives new technology and inventions by making "unreasonable" demands on our technical capabilities.

STFC is working hard to maximise these benefits to the economy by developing science and innovation campuses where we encourage spin out companies, are setting up business incubation centres with CERN and the European Space Agency, and as a focus for collaboration with industry.  And most importantly, there is very exciting science and many more challenges ahead both at CERN and in new inspirational projects like the Square Kilometre Array.

About the speaker

Professor John Wormersley is Chief Executive of the Science and Technology Facilities Council, the UK's funding agency for physics, astronomy and large research facilities.

A graduate of Cambridge and Oxford, he has played a leading role in particle physics, both in Europe and the United States.  John's scientific achievements include his time as spokesperson for Fermilab's D-Zero experiment, including placing the first experimental particle physics paper in Nature for more than 70 years.  He also represents the UK in number of international forums including the Council of the European Southern Observatory and the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). John lives in Oxford with his wife and is a visiting professor at the University of Durham, University College London and the University of Oxford.

 

Programme

18.00 Registration

18.30 Lecture

19.30 Q&A

20.00 Networking reception



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