Can radio deliver the home area network for future Smart Energy?

This successful partnership series with Cambridge Wireless once again opened up a challenging area; Smart Energy. Radio is attractive for this “Home Area Network” since it makes no demands on the existing wiring and could communicate with devices (such as gas meters) that are “off grid”.

Areas such as long-term service requirements, spectrum availability, propagation, interference, suitability of existing and proposed radio interfaces, practical equipment design issues and the results of real trial deployments were up for exploration and discussion.

Presentations were heard from:

  • Professor William Webb FREng FIET FIEEE of Neul and representing The IET
  • Dr. William Harrold of the Department for Energy and Climate Change
  • Professor of Communications Richard Langley of The University of Sheffield and also representing The IET
  • A presentation will be heard from Ofcom.

  This joint ICT KTN and Cambridge Wireless SIG in association with The IET is championed by John Haine of Cognovo, Brian Collins of Antenova Ltd and Daniel Bradford of Cambridge Broadband Networks. We are also grateful to Rohde & Schwarz for their joint sponsorship of lunch for this event.

Smart Energy systems are one key component of a low-carbon future, reducing energy consumption by fine-grained control of appliances and processes according to overall demand on the grid and service agreements between suppliers and consumers.  For these systems to work, energy meters will need to communicate with appliances in the home as well as the suppliers’ demand management systems.  Radio is attractive for this “Home Area Network” since it makes no demands on the existing wiring and could communicate with devices (such as gas meters) that are “off grid”.

But this is a challenging application for radio.  Transmit powers will be low; devices may be located in radio-hostile places like outdoor metal meter lockers or basements; spectrum may have to be shared with other applications; there could be nearby systems on adjacent frequencies as well as local interference sources; independent systems will have to operate in neighbouring apartments; and installed systems will need to work reliably for up to 20 years.

This event will explore these issues, starting with the long-term service requirements, and looking at spectrum availability, propagation, interference, suitability of existing and proposed radio interfaces, practical equipment design issues, and the results of real trial deployments.

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Home Area Networks - Scenario-based Propagation Modelling

Stirling Essex
From: Can Radio Deliver The Home Area Network For Future Smart Energy?, 26th April 2012, Cambridge

2012-04-26 | Communications Channel

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In-Home Radio Propagation Characteristics: What do we know?

Richard Moore, Principal Technologist, Ofcom
From: Can Radio Deliver The Home Area Network For Future Smart Energy?, 26th April 2012, Cambridge

2012-04-26 | Communications Channel

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Smart Metering via Wireless - Is this a Short Range or Long Range Application?

William Webb of Neul, and representing the IET
From: Can Radio Deliver The Home Area Network For Future Smart Energy?, 26th April 2012, Cambridge

2012-04-26 | Communications Channel

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Wireless Systems in the Home Environment

Professor Richard Langley, Professor of Comunications Research, University of Sheffield
From: Can Radio Deliver The Home Area Network For Future Smart Energy?, 26th April 2012, Cambridge

2012-04-26 | Communications Channel

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