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Topic Title: E&T magazine - Debate - Are printed newspapers doomed? Should they all go digital?
Topic Summary: We may live in a digital age, but printed newspapers are part of our culture and are here to stay
Created On: 19 December 2012 11:21 AM
Status: Read Only
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 23 January 2013 04:48 PM
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dduncan99

Posts: 3
Joined: 23 January 2013

I think that in the next five to ten years, a lot of our mainstream print newspapers and magazines will start to die off, and will slowly be replaced with their online counterparts. Websites are easier to maintain, and cheaper to run, with online advertising making it possible to not only stay alive, but to actually increase profit margins. You have to adapt to the times these days, or else you'll just get left behind.

I'm sure that there will still be specialty prints out there for a long time yet, for those enthusiasts that still want the feel of paper, but as the kids today get older and tablets get to be more common, they will dwindle over time and be one of those memories that we tell our grandchildren.. "Back in my day, we got our news on sheets of paper.. those were the good old days."
 06 February 2013 09:31 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: dduncan99
I think that in the next five to ten years, a lot of our mainstream print newspapers and magazines will start to die off, and will slowly be replaced with their online counterparts. Websites are easier to maintain, and cheaper to run, with online advertising making it possible to not only stay alive, but to actually increase profit margins. You have to adapt to the times these days, or else you'll just get left behind.


The transition from print to online is not as smooth and as simple as you think. Once a newspaper is online and ceases to be printed then it is effectively in direct competition with countless other online news and media websites. This is why I have previously made references to foreign and alternative media sources. The high status of newspapers in Britain today is a result of their widespread availability; lack of direct competition from foreign and alternative print media in retail outlets; and their long standing reputation as most titles have existed before most people were even born. If newspapers go online then it is highly likely that they will suffer a similar fate as television channels have. The BBC is generally seen as a prominent national institution by the older generation who remembers watching it in the 405 line era. It has a good name and reputation with such people. To most 10 year olds who have known nothing but a multi-channel world it is just one of many broadcasters. The Daily Telegraph and Guardian could end up in the same situation once the printing presses are switched off.

I'm sure that there will still be specialty prints out there for a long time yet, for those enthusiasts that still want the feel of paper, but as the kids today get older and tablets get to be more common, they will dwindle over time and be one of those memories that we tell our grandchildren.. "Back in my day, we got our news on sheets of paper.. those were the good old days."


I'm wondering how long the Morning Star will remain in print.

There must be some communities of people out there who are on the wrong side of the digital divide and will continue to buy print media as a result. Are communists one of them?
 09 August 2013 03:56 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

One of the most noteworthy criticisms of newspapers compared to other media sources is a lack of new choices. During my own lifetime I have witnessed television transform from just 3 terrestrial channels to more channels than I can count; a large increase in the number of independent radio stations; the emergence of videos and DVDs; and of course the internet, but the emergence of new newspapers has been an infrequent event. Almost all of the national British newspapers on sale today were on sale 50 years ago. The same probably applies to the local papers but can anybody verify this.

I used to read Today back in the late 1980s on the assumption that it was more forward thinking because of it being a new title, and also the fact that it was produced using the latest computer technology. Many newspapers that have started in the past 25 years have struggled to compete in the market and eventually folded. Does anybody remember The European and the very short lived Sunday Correspondent?
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