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Topic Title: Wireless on net work
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Created On: 04 November 2012 09:22 AM
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 04 November 2012 09:22 AM
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Avatar for OldSparky.
OldSparky

Posts: 592
Joined: 28 June 2011

hello peeps

i have a wired home net work..

i was wondering if there was a device that i could add to the net work her that could be wirless, my daughter uses an pad and the wirless wont reach to her bed room so i thought there must be a device i can plug in to the net work the make the i pad connect to the net..


i have i made sense here

cheers
 04 November 2012 12:46 PM
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Roundtrip

Posts: 247
Joined: 17 June 2006

Is the existing wireless router in a central location? Can it be moved to a place where it is more centrally located? Is it an 802.11n or 802.11g router? The range of the former tends to be better.

Some routers have detachable antennas which would allow you to put on a higher gain WiFi antenna.

If you can run a network cable from your existing router to a location in the house where you'd like wireless coverage, you could use a Wireless Access Point (WAP).

Most WAPs can be set to act as repeaters. In this mode you would place the WAP close to the area you want the coverage but still in the existing wireless zone. The WAP would take the existing wireless network traffic and retransmitted it. One disadvantage of this mode is it increases the network traffic as every bit of wireless network data is retransmitted - this has the effect of halving the throughput.

There are a few other range extender options available. For examples, see the Netgear range:
http://netgear.co.uk/home/prod...ange-extenders/


There are other possibiliies but the options above are the most common.

-------------------------
Best wishes & regards

John A Thomson
allayit

Edited: 04 November 2012 at 01:08 PM by Roundtrip
 14 November 2012 03:34 PM
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gordon.s1

Posts: 105
Joined: 20 September 2001

Use a type n router or plug router into an ethernet socket and link to a mains Home Network Plug.
These items allow your mains cabling to be used for networking, they allow ethernet to run over the mains.

-------------------------
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 14 November 2012 06:54 PM
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bryangb

Posts: 3
Joined: 07 April 2009

I'd echo Gordon's suggestion. HomePlug, also known as PowerLine, runs the network over the mains. You can get HomePlug plugs that then also transmit wireless/WiFi (so they act as a WAP of the type John describes).

So if the existing WiFi won't reach your daughter's room, you could connect the wired network to one HomePlug and plug that into the mains. Then you get a 2nd HomePlug of the kind that also does WiFi and plug that into the mains in her room. She then gets her own wireless network there.
 19 November 2012 12:22 PM
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haguetim

Posts: 109
Joined: 25 April 2006

Please do not use Homeplug. It causes interference to other services for up to 100M from the device and can also slow down your ADSL.
They are dreadful bits of kit. I have an IPad and connect to the internet via a wireless network with no problems anywhere within my house.
 21 November 2012 09:43 AM
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normcall

Posts: 8149
Joined: 15 January 2005

I had a similar problem.
Used an old router as a wireless device.
Connect to the wired network, give it a fixed address, then switch on the wireless function as you would a normal router.
Points to watch
1 - might be easier to set IP address before connecting to network
2 - use the main router IP address as gateway on both the wireless router and main router.
3 - use a separate channel (ideally not both routers as wireless).

I have a wireless main router with wireless disabled, no DHCP. On the 'remote' router, DHCP enabled and just a limited number of addresses (10) that can be used. Main is a Belkin dual band and remote is a Netgear 54G router modem. Belkin in loft and Netgear in conservatory.

-------------------------
Norman
 04 December 2012 08:14 PM
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Avatar for OldSparky.
OldSparky

Posts: 592
Joined: 28 June 2011

thanks for your replies guys.. maybe i havent been clear.

i have a wired network through out the house, my daughter has bought an i pad which requires a wirless conection..

my network goes through a patch panel and switch as does the wirless hub which then is connected to the phone line..

i cant move the hub and the wireless wont reach her room,

so i was hoping some might know if there was a device i could plug into her network point in her room to make a wireless connection to the i pad.
 04 December 2012 09:38 PM
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Roundtrip

Posts: 247
Joined: 17 June 2006

I refer you to my earlier reply....

If you can run a network cable from your existing router to a location in the house where you'd like wireless coverage, you could use a Wireless Access Point (WAP).

Use a WAP. Plugs straight into the network patch point.

-------------------------
Best wishes & regards

John A Thomson
allayit
 04 December 2012 09:42 PM
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Roundtrip

Posts: 247
Joined: 17 June 2006

See:
http://www.ebuyer.com/store/Ne...s/subcat/Access-Points

-------------------------
Best wishes & regards

John A Thomson
allayit
 06 December 2012 10:39 PM
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OldSparky

Posts: 592
Joined: 28 June 2011

http://www.belkin.com/uk/null-...SNT/WSNTWLS/WSNTWLSRE

would this do the job,,

regards

Paul
 07 December 2012 04:26 AM
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Roundtrip

Posts: 247
Joined: 17 June 2006

Wouldn't trust Belkin kit to work even when brand new!!!!

Seen too many DOA routers over the years.

I recommend a wireless access point not a range extender.

-------------------------
Best wishes & regards

John A Thomson
allayit
 16 March 2013 05:27 PM
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buraqtech

Posts: 1
Joined: 16 March 2013

i would recommend Cisco AP they always work best

Regards
USMAN
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