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Topic Title: Machinery Electrical Drawing?
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Created On: 14 February 2012 10:08 AM
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 14 February 2012 10:08 AM
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sandyscott

Posts: 2
Joined: 06 February 2012

Hi there,

I've been thrown in at the deep end somewhat with my new job, and although my degree is mostly in mechanical engineering, I now find myself responsible for the documentation of our electrical systems (I had some help with the actual design)

Essentially I'm looking for any information that will help me feel a bit more confident about this area.

The machine itself is a commercial washing machine, so uses 3 phase power (but on a relatively small scale) with a PLC controlling it via 24VDC signals.

- Are there drawing standards for this sort of thing? if so where can I find them (and symbol libraries if necessary)

- Can anyone recommend a good course, preferably online or book-based, though I would consider other options depending on how good they look

- Any recommended software? We've got an old copy of AutoCad Electrical, but I'm not a big fan - it's heritage (some electrical features crudely tacked on to a package that's really about 2D drawing) seems to get in the way more than it helps. We can afford to spend some money on this, just looking for any ideas.

Thanks very much

Sandy
 28 February 2012 06:33 PM
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Steve56

Posts: 10
Joined: 04 December 2004

Have a look here -
http://www.moeller.net/en/support/wiring_manual.jsp

this is the Eaton/Moeller wiring manual and gives a lot of useful information as well as details of standards.
It can be downloaded for free.

Autocad is "horrible" for electrical schematics - I use Elcad by Aucotec.
Easy to use and the UK tech support is very good.
 29 February 2012 12:42 AM
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riaz14

Posts: 15
Joined: 11 June 2011

I think you should download the book name "Newnes Industrial Control Wiring Guide" and go through it,once you know the symbol and notations you can use autocad electrical 2011,it is free for one month and try it i hope this will help you.
 02 March 2012 06:37 AM
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Wheelermch

Posts: 39
Joined: 04 June 2007

Sandy, is this a new design then? Is it therefore going to be marketed? I am puzzelled by your post as I could read into it a number of things. Are you also responsible for the Technical File documentation as well ie CE marking it?
Becareful if so there is very significant work in CE marking such machinery unless you have the specialist knowledge.
 07 March 2012 09:32 AM
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sandyscott

Posts: 2
Joined: 06 February 2012

Steve56:
Thanks for that link - once you get past the bits which are just glorified catalogue, there's some useful data in there

Also, the hint on Elcad seems worth pursuing - though they do seem to be pushing new customers towards their other product, Engineering Base. Does anyone have any experience/opinions on that?

riaz14:
From what I can tell, that book is mostly about the physical wiring assembly, not drawings and design. Looks like it might have some useful hints though

Wheelermch:
We realise that CE marking is a serious issue - Our main focus is a technology development company, so in due course the designs will be handed to a manufacturing partner who may re-work them as much or as little as necessary to suit their purposes.

Thanks all for these ideas. I'd still really like to find a book or course which covers this sort of electrical design though.

Regards

Sandy
 09 March 2012 04:16 AM
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KevinH2

Posts: 21
Joined: 09 June 2008

I have been using Autosketch an inexpensive simple 2D CAD package for around 10 years and I find it great for electrical schematics.

Kevin H
 14 March 2012 07:13 AM
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PCA

Posts: 2
Joined: 03 May 2003

Hi Sandy

Eplan P8 is fantastic software for electrical design, it has all of the standard symbols built in along with a good on-line catalogue to download supplier data sheets and macros.
The software is around £4K for initial purchase but then around £200 per year to keep your support contract going.
Their training can be tailored to suit your needs.
The initial investment may seem high but once you get to grips with the software it is a great tool.

I have used AutoCad Electrical and I would say that Eplan is by far the better software.

Hope this may help

Paul

-------------------------
Paul Appleby MIEE
 20 March 2012 08:06 PM
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jpichaimuthu

Posts: 16
Joined: 03 March 2012

Hi

I use Microsoft Visio, it is good as well, not very expensive and you can do every single drawing mostly.

Jag
 16 April 2012 08:55 AM
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dougflorence

Posts: 74
Joined: 25 July 2008

I would advise you to think about risk assessment and design for CE conformity at an earlier rather than later stage of design. There is little we like less than somebody presenting us with a machine that they think is ready for market and asking us to help them with the CE marking. Then we tell them all the problems they have not noticed.

Early consideration of design for CE conformity saves time and money in the overall project.
 10 October 2012 06:27 AM
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margaritelsoto

Posts: 12
Joined: 13 September 2012

Electrical wiring diagrams that show you how electrical items and wires connect are important when learning how to become an electrician or when doing your own electrical work on a do-it-yourself basis. Generally, doing electrical work yourself is not recommended both because it is dangerous and you can electrocute yourself and start a fire, but also because there are strict building codes that must be complied with when installing electronics. Still, electrical wiring diagrams that teach you or your electrician how to wire something are an invaluable tool to learn how electricity works and how circuits go together.
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