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Topic Title: Main Bonding Lead pipe
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Created On: 21 December 2009 12:35 AM
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 22 December 2009 03:24 PM
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Avatar for ebee.
ebee

Posts: 5666
Joined: 02 December 2004

"Wouldnt water start p***ing out? "

It never occoured to me, just that the air would get in!

It`s a good job you`re here Carl Lad

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 22 December 2009 03:30 PM
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Baz

Posts: 146
Joined: 24 May 2009

You are required to bond as near to the position that the pipe enters the building as possible and after the consumer's stopcock. Now, assuming a stopcock is fitted in the house it will be brass, sweated onto the lead, clean off the brass and fit a bonding clamp to the brass, this will not crush as may the lead in time. Hope this helps.
 22 December 2009 03:31 PM
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Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19463
Joined: 23 March 2004

It's always the problem that's not even on the radar that catches us out Ebee

Merry Xmas

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 22 December 2009 03:57 PM
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spinlondon

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Joined: 10 December 2004

Not aware of any Regulation stipulating that the bonding should be after the stop cock.
Is that a new Regulation in the 17th?
 22 December 2009 04:23 PM
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Phillron

Posts: 1168
Joined: 18 January 2007

Originally posted by: spinlondon

Not aware of any Regulation stipulating that the bonding should be after the stop cock.

Is that a new Regulation in the 17th?



The connection shall be made to the consumers hard metal pipework
544.1.2
This may be as near as it gets to a yes
It seems to rule out the stop tap itself though
 09 May 2010 07:48 AM
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BS76712008

Posts: 19
Joined: 05 May 2010

Hello

Bonding to Lead is no problem at all!

If you really dont want to put BS earth clamp on th lead then here goes.

First of all is the distribution board up to modern day standards eg do
ALL circuit have rcd protection possibly a mixture of rcd / rcbo's if the
if answer is YES then lead is not a problem and you therefore do not need to supplimentary bond the or bathroom etc. - all you need is some interwoven tinned copper braid and earth terminal single or multiway earth terminal block.

Next job unless you have the skillls to sweat (solder the braid) to the lead main incoming water pipe then call a plumber to do it for you. You then connect the braid to the earth block then connect your 10mm csa copper the block then back to the board. SIMPLES!


Or as an alternative get a plumber to cut out a section of the lead and
fit a brass body stop valve with two short lengths of copper either side which are sweated (soldered) to the lead you can then fit your clamp onto the copper on the output side of the stop valve. SIMPLES!

Edited: 09 May 2010 at 08:11 AM by BS76712008
 09 May 2010 07:53 AM
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BS76712008

Posts: 19
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No because it is obvious that it's no gonna work.

The correct melting point of the solder cannot be reached due to thermal
conduction of the water!

That's why when i solder braid to lead i first remove the water from
inside the pipe using one of several different methods.
 09 May 2010 12:06 PM
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daveparry1

Posts: 6105
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That's why when i solder braid to lead i first remove the water from
inside the pipe using one of several different methods.
-------------------------------------
Just the same as when soldering copper fittings to pipes, you'll never get enough heat if there's any water in the pipe.
Going back to the subject though, I really don't see a problem with putting a bs951 onto a lead water pipe, and for anyone that's going to say the pipe could get crushed, no chance, have you ever seen how thick walled lead water pipe is?

Dave.
 09 May 2010 10:17 PM
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Avatar for potential.
potential

Posts: 1255
Joined: 01 February 2007

Anyone attempting to "solder" onto lead pipe should experiment on a piece of lead pipe beforehand.
Old lead will appears solid under heat until it suddenly melts and runs away leaving the outer oxide skin behind.
It's gone before you know it.
I really wouldn't advise wiping lead joints or soldering unless you know what you are doing.
 09 May 2010 11:41 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11284
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Going back to the subject though, I really don't see a problem with putting a bs951 onto a lead water pipe, and for anyone that's going to say the pipe could get crushed, no chance, have you ever seen how thick walled lead water pipe is?

Agreed. All the lead pipe for high pressure (e.g. incoming mains) water I've come across is at least as robust as modern copper tube. I think thinner walled stuff was often used to lower pressure water (e.g. distribution pipes supplied by a cistern in the loft) and for gas, but not likely to be an issue when main bonding water.
- Andy.
IET » Wiring and the regulations » Main Bonding Lead pipe

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